borrow from (someone or something)

(redirected from borrow from it)

borrow from (someone or something)

1. Literally, to use something that belongs to another person, with the intent to return it later. A noun or pronoun can be used between "borrow" and "from." Because I found a date to the dance at the last minute, I just borrowed a dress and shoes from my sister. I ran out of art supplies so I had to start borrowing from Steve.
2. Of a work of some kind, to use elements from something else. That movie may be a comedy, but its plot borrows from crime films of the 1940s.
See also: borrow

borrow something from someone

to request and receive the use of something from someone. Can I borrow a hammer from you? Sorry, this hammer was borrowed from my father.
See also: borrow
References in periodicals archive ?
class="MsoNormalspan xml:lang="EN-GB"What most people do is that you borrow from this TB, table it at the another TB then you borrow from it, table this at the next one..
Women who join the SHGs contribute 30 rupees (about 70 cents) a month to the pot, then are eligible to borrow from it to start small businesses.