borne


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Related to borne: ceaselessly

bear away

1. To carry or transport someone or something away. A noun or pronoun can be used between "bear" and "away." We sat teary-eyed on the platform as the train bore our only son away to college. A team of laborers began bearing away the debris, piece by piece.
2. In sailing, to steer the boat away from the direction of the wind. The helmsman began shouting for the crew to bear away to gain a burst of speed from the increasing wind.
See also: away, bear

bear down

1. To carry or transport someone or something down along something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "bear" and "down." The current bore us down the river toward the ocean. The courier bore the parcel down the road as quickly as he could.
2. To push downward with one's abdomen, as when giving birth or passing stool. At some point you're going to feel an intense urge to bear down, which means the baby is on her way.
3. To put forth one's maximum effort or apply one's maximum concentration (toward action or activity). I know you've been having trouble with your studies, but it's time to bear down and make sure you pass.
4. Of a boat, to approach from an upwind direction. The other boat began bearing down at an incredible speed.
See also: bear, down

bear down on (someone or something)

1. Literally, to press down hard on a surface or item. I bore down on the eraser, but I still couldn't fully erase my drawing. Really bear down on the bandage there—more pressure will slow the bleeding until we get to the hospital.
2. To put forth one's maximum effort toward something. If you want to get a passing grade this semester, you'll really need to bear down on your studies.
3. To move closer to someone or something, usually in an intimidating or frightening way. I'm going over the speed limit, so I have no idea why this car is bearing down on me. We ducked into a store to avoid the angry man who'd been bearing down on us.
See also: bear, down, on

bear in

In backgammon, to bring a checker into one's home board. With the favorable dice roll, player one will be able to start bearing in.
See also: bear

bear in (up)on (one)

To be revealed gradually to one that something is the case; to dawn on one. The more I heard, the more it bore in on me that Tom was already well aware of what transpired. It had begun to bear in upon us that the mission was doomed to failure.
See also: bear

bear in with (something)

To sail toward something. The large boat began bearing in with the shore.
See also: bear

bear off

1. To carry or transport someone or something away. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "bear" and "off." We sat teary-eyed on the platform as the train bore our only son off to college. A team of laborers began bearing off pieces of the debris one at a time.
2. In sailing, to steer the boat away from the direction of the wind. The helmsman began shouting for the crew to bear off in order to gain a burst of speed from the increasing wind.
3. In sailing, to steer the boat away from some obstruction or other hazard. Be sure to bear off those rocks. The last thing we need now is a breach in the hull.
4. In backgammon, to clear a checker off the board, the objective of the game. Now that all of his checkers are home, he can begin bearing off.
See also: bear, off

bear off from (someone or something)

1. To carry or transport someone or something away from someone or something else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "bear" and "off." We sat teary eyed on the platform as the train bore our only son off from us. A team of laborers began bearing pieces of debris off from the wreckage.
2. In sailing, to steer the boat in the direction away from something else. The helmsman began shouting for the crew to bear off from the wind in order to gain a burst of speed.
3. In sailing, to steer the boat away from some obstruction or other hazard. Be sure to bear off from those rocks. The last thing we need now is a breach in the hull.
4. In sailing, to move away from something else. The steamer bore off from the island, leaving several people stranded.
5. In backgammon, to clear a checker from a particular position on the board. You can't bear off from the three-point yet because there are still checkers on the four-point.
See also: bear, off

bear out

To support or prove a claim or idea. If you didn't do anything wrong, then the investigation will bear out your innocence.
See also: bear, out

bear with (someone or something)

To remain patient and attentive, especially during a lengthy or problematic situation that may cause one to want to quit or leave prematurely. Often used as an imperative. I'm moving a little slower these days, so please bear with me. We don't want to see this great school close down, so we're begging the teachers to bear with it, in spite of all the uncertainty. Bear with us while we deal with these technical issues.
See also: bear
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

bear down (on someone or something)

to press down on someone or something. Bear down on the pen. You have to make a lot of copies. Don't bear down too hard or you'll break it.
See also: bear, down

bear off (of something)

to turn off a road or course. Bear off the main road to the left. Don't bear off too sharply.
See also: bear, off

bear something out

[for facts or evidence] to support or confirm a story or explanation. The facts don't bear this out. Her story bears out exactly what you said.
See also: bear, out
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bear down

1. Press or weigh down on someone or something. For example, This pen doesn't write unless you bear down hard on it. [Late 1600s]
2. Try hard, intensify one's efforts, as in If you'll just bear down, you'll pass the test.
3. Move forward in a pressing or threatening way, as in The ferry bore down on our little skiff. This usage was originally nautical. [Early 1700s]
See also: bear, down

bear out

Back up or confirm, as in The results bear out what he predicted, or His story bears me out exactly. [Late 1400s]
See also: bear, out
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bear down

v.
1. To press or push down heavily on someone or something: To knead this dough you have to bear down on it with both hands. I grabbed the corners of the blanket and bore down hard to stop the wind from blowing it away.
2. To apply maximum effort and concentration: Now that the games are over, I can really bear down on my studies. To finish this job you'll need to bear down and work very hard.
3. To advance upon someone or something in a threatening manner: As soon as I had control of the soccer ball, I saw the tackle bearing down on me. The storm bore down and ravaged the island.
See also: bear, down

bear out

v.
To be evidence that something is true or that what someone says is true; support something or someone: The test results bear out our claims. I told them my side of the story and the evidence bore me out.
See also: bear, out
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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