born with a silver spoon in your mouth

born with a silver spoon in (one's) mouth

Born into a wealthy family. We may both be wealthy now, but I was not born with a silver spoon in my mouth. I had nothing when I was young, and all of my fortune is down to my own hard work. Everyone who attends that university was born with a silver spoon in their mouth, so I just don't think it's the right place for me.
See also: born, mouth, silver, spoon

born with a silver spoon in your mouth

If you say that someone was born with a silver spoon in their mouth, you mean that their parents were very rich. He's wealthy now but he certainly wasn't born with a silver spoon in his mouth. Note: You can use silver-spoon before a noun to describe a person like this or their lifestyle. Hers was no silver-spoon upbringing. Note: You often use this expression to show disapproval. Note: This expression goes back to the 17th century. The reference is to babies from wealthy families being fed using silver spoons.
See also: born, mouth, silver, spoon
References in periodicals archive ?
How come if you were born with a silver spoon in your mouth, the law turns coy on you?
Mrs Cheer, 54, previously spent 28 years in uniform proving you don't need to be born with a silver spoon in your mouth to reach the top in your career.
Auctioneers Bigwood said: "If you feel you really should have been born with a silver spoon in your mouth, you can can buy your way into the world of the landed gentry.
Some morals may be familiar such as Aesop's "Slow but steady wins the race"; others might be new to the reader, such as "Being born with a silver spoon in your mouth doesn't teach you how to feed yourself.
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