bear with (someone or something)

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bear with (someone or something)

To remain patient and attentive, especially during a lengthy or problematic situation that may cause one to want to quit or leave prematurely. Often used as an imperative. I'm moving a little slower these days, so please bear with me. We don't want to see this great school close down, so we're begging the teachers to bear with it, in spite of all the uncertainty. Bear with us while we deal with these technical issues.
See also: bear
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

bear with someone or something

to be patient with someone or something; to wait upon someone or something. (Especially through difficulties.) Please bear with me for a moment while I try to get this straightened out. Can you bear with the committee until it reaches a decision?
See also: bear
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bear with

Put up with, make allowance for, as in He'll just have to bear with them until they decide. Nicholas Udall used this term in Ralph Roister Doister (c. 1553): "The heart of a man should more honour win by bearing with a woman." It may also be used as an imperative, as in Bear with me-I'm getting to the point.
See also: bear
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bear with

v.
To be patient with someone or something: The explanation I will give is complicated, so please bear with me.
See also: bear
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bear with me

Be patient, make allowances, put up with me. Today used mainly as a request to hear out a long-winded story or wait for a delayed result or event, this request appeared in John Heywood’s proverb collection of 1546. It may already have been considered somewhat archaic by Benjamin Franklin when he wrote, in An Added Chapter to the Book of Genesis (1763), “And couldst not thou . . . bear with him one night?”
See also: bear
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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