booted


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Related to booted: booted out

boot

1. noun, slang A thrill; a jolt of pleasure or excitement. I always get a boot out of seeing the kids open their gifts on each day of Hanukkah. Just because we're retired doesn't mean we can't get a boot out of life!
2. verb, slang To dismiss or discharge someone unceremoniously from some job, role, position, etc. A: "What happened to Bill?" B: "I heard they booted him for screwing up the Robertson accounts." They booted the senator out of office after evidence of his involvement in the scandal came to light.
3. verb, slang To eject or remove someone from some place. Tell the bouncer to boot those obnoxious guys, will ya? You have no grounds to boot us out of here! Hey, watch the hair!
4. verb, slang To vomit. I've been so sick that I feel like I've booted everything I've ever eaten.

boot out

A noun or pronoun can be used between "boot" and "out."
1. To force someone or something to leave a place, usually unceremoniously. Maria has to get up early tomorrow morning, so she booted us out before 9 PM. When dad got home from his business trip, he booted out the stray dog we'd taken in while he was away.
2. To expel someone from a group or organization. The company decided to boot out the CEO after his illegal activities came to light. They threatened to boot me out of college due to the allegations.
See also: boot, out

boot up

To turn on a computer. A noun or pronoun can be used between "boot" and "up" I think something is wrong with my computer—it's taking a really long time to boot up.
See also: boot, up

get booted

slang To have a "boot," a large metal clamp, attached to one's tire so that their vehicle cannot be driven. Typically done by the authorities because one has parked illegally. A: "Aw man, did I seriously get booted?" B: "Dude, that sign next to your car clearly says 'No Parking.'"
See also: booted, get
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

*boot

dismissal from employment or from a place that one is in. (*Typically: get ~; give someone ~.) I guess I wasn't dressed well enough to go in there. They gave me the boot. I'll work harder at my job today. I nearly got the boot yesterday.

boot something up

to start up a computer. She booted her computer up and started writing. Please go boot up your computer so we can get started.
See also: boot, up

boot up

[of a computer] to begin operating; to start up one's computer. He turned on the computer and it booted up. Try to boot up again and see what happens.
See also: boot, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

boot up

Start a computer, as in When you've booted up, it's best not to turn off the computer until you're done for the day . The term, dating from the late 1970s, was a shortening of bootstrap, another computer idiom referring to using one set of instructions to load another set of instructions. Also see log in.
See also: boot, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

boot out

v.
To force someone or something to leave a place or position: The principal booted the troublemaker out of the school. I booted the peddler out the door. The fan who threw a bottle at the umpire was booted out of the ballpark.
See also: boot, out

boot up

v.
1. To cause some computer or similar device to start working and and prepare for operation: This program will boot up your disk drive automatically. My computer is so badly damaged that I can't even boot it up.
2. To start working and prepare for operation. Used of computers and related devices: My new computer boots up in less than 30 seconds.
See also: boot, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

boot

1. n. a thrill; a charge. I get a real boot out of my grandchildren.
2. tv. to dismiss or eject someone. I booted him myself.
3. n. a dismissal or ejection. I got the boot even though I had worked there for a decade.
4. tv. & in. to start the operating system of a computer. When I booted, all I got was a feep.
5. in. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. The kid booted and booted and will probably never smoke another cigar.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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