boom

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ace boom-boom

One's close friend. Oh, I'm sure he invited Dave—that's his ace boom-boom.
See also: ace

boom

An exclamation used in conjunction with a decisive or impressive statement or action. Boom! You can't argue with that logic. Straight flush, I win the pot! Boom.

boom or bust

Resulting in an outcome that will either be very good or very bad. Many professional athletes face a boom or bust situation early in their career, where they are either drafted to a professional league or don't advance at all. Working in the oil fields is always boom or bust: there's either lots of work for everyone, or hardly any work for anyone.
See also: boom, bust

boom out

1. To produce a loud sound that bursts forth. The sound of the car engine boomed out and made us all jump.
2. To speak loudly or forcefully. A noun or pronoun can be used between "boom" and "out." The security guard boomed instructions out at us as we pulled into the parking lot.
See also: boom, out

boom sticks

slang Drumsticks. The band's drummer is refusing to go on stage because he can't find his favorite pair of boom sticks.
See also: boom, stick

boombox

A large, portable radio. The stereotypical image of hip hop in the '80s is a guy walking down the street with a huge boombox on his shoulder. I can't hear myself think, thanks to the kids blasting their boombox at the park.

lower the boom (on someone or something)

1. To punish someone or something harshly. He's a really strict teacher, so he'll definitely lower the boom on you if you don't do your homework. Well, Mom lowered the boom and grounded me for a month because I came home after curfew again.
2. To halt something or bring about its end. I used demerits to lower the boom on silliness in my class.
See also: boom, lower, someone

boom out

[for a loud sound] to sound out like thunder. His voice boomed out such that everyone could hear. An explosion boomed out and frightened us all.
See also: boom, out

boom something out

[for someone] to say something very loud; to shout. Will someone with a loud voice boom the names out? The announcer boomed out the names of the players.
See also: boom, out

lower the boom on someone

Fig. to scold or punish someone severely; to crack down on someone; to throw the book at someone. If Bob won't behave better, I'll have to lower the boom on him. The teacher lowered the boom on the whole class for misbehaving.
See also: boom, lower, on

lower the boom on

Scold harshly or punish severely; also, put a stop to something. For example, If you're caught smoking in school, the principal is bound to lower the boom on you, or The new radar equipment enabled the police to lower the boom on speeding. This expression refers to the boom of a sailboat-a long spar that extends from the mast to hold the foot of the sail. In a changing wind, the boom can swing wildly, leaving one at risk of being struck. [Slang; first half of 1900s]
See also: boom, lower, on

lower the boom on

1 treat someone severely. 2 put a stop to an activity. informal
It has been suggested that this phrase originally meant ‘knocking out an adversary with one punch’ in a fight.
See also: boom, lower, on

boom out

v.
1. To make a loud, deep sound: Rock music suddenly boomed out from the speakers.
2. To say something very loudly: She boomed her speech out to the entire building over the public address system. He boomed out the sermon in his thunderous voice.
See also: boom, out

ace boom-boom

and ace boon-coon
n. one’s good and loyal friend. (Black. Ace boon-coon is not as common as the first entry and is objected to because of coon.) Hey girlfriend, you are my ace boom-boom. Where is my old ace boon-coon, bro?
See also: ace

boom

in. to listen to music, as with a boom box. If you’re going to boom all the time, why don’t you get some headphones?

boom box

n. a portable stereo radio. (see also box, thunderbox.) Turn down that damn boom box, or I’ll kick it in.
See also: boom, box

boom sticks

n. drumsticks. (Musicians.) He always carries his boom sticks in his back pocket, and he beats on walls, radiators, desks—you name it.
See also: boom, stick

lower the boom, to

To punish severely, to take a decisive action against. This slangy expression, also sometimes used in the meaning of literally delivering a knockout punch, dates from the first half of the 1900s. It alludes to a sailboat’s boom, which can swing wildly in a changing wind. For example, “The bank lowered the boom on Jim and demanded the collateral on his loan.”
See also: lower
References in periodicals archive ?
Adding to the production of the articulating Z-45 XC boom lift, the new Genie S-65 XC boom lift is the first telescopic XC model to be manufactured at the brand's factory in Umbertide, Italy -- the Genie 'Boom Centre of Excellence' for the EMEAR region, dedicated to the production of the boom lifts that are popular with customer the region and are equipped with options they prefer.
Leading the large articulated boom market, the Genie ZX-135/70 lift still features a maximum working height of 141 ft, 69 ft 9 in of horizontal outreach and a 75 ft of up-and-over clearance - all accessible with a 272 kg platform capacity.
Due to the fact that vibration is very important in the dynamics and kinematics analysis of the concrete pump boom, a rigid-flexible method is adopted in this paper to establish an accurate model of the boom.
One of the ways to minimize the coefficients of variation of the spray distribution is to install mechanisms to stabilize the boom within acceptable parameters.
Lacbain said the booms could have also been intended for dredging activities.
Begun in the spring of 2001, the program used a specially modified F-5E fighter to show the persistence of a shaped sonic boom. To achieve the desired results, Northrop engineers produced sixty different aircraft configurations, primarily focused on the F-5E's nose.
* Split boom, an economic boom designed for operating in light to medium jobsite conditions.
In 1895 and 1896, a French science publication, Sky and Earth, printed pages of information on booms heard along the European coastlines.
The admittedly mechanical methods for identifying booms (and busts) essentially rule out anything from being an asset price boom unless the deviation from average or trend price growth is sustained for more than four quarters.
As oil continues to spill onto the coast, absorbent booms will be even more effective in marshy areas or along coastlines than in the ocean where there is a lot of turbulence.
New fixed-width axles have been added to the S-80 and S-85 machines, giving the booms an 8.16 ft.
The housing boom has produced negative savings rates and higher consumer spending in the United States, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada.
Global Ground Support LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Air T Inc (Nasdaq: AIRT), has repaired and recertified ten deicing booms at Philadelphia International Airport.
* Available attachments include lifting forks, buckets, orange peel grapples and crane booms