boomer


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baby boomer

An American person born during the "baby boom" following World War II, between the years of 1945 and 1965, during which the population of the United States increased by 40 percent. Typically used to describe members of this generation, who have been associated with economic prosperity, consumerism, self-indulgence. Primarily heard in US. Since baby boomers represent such a large percentage of the population, financial experts are concerned about the impact their retirement will have on the economy.
See also: baby, boomer

a ˈbaby boomer

(American English also a ˈboomer) a person born during a period when many more babies are born than usual (called a baby boom), especially after the Second World War: The new President was a baby boomer, born in the 1950s.
See also: baby, boomer

(baby) boomer

n. someone born during the baby boom—from the last years of World War II until the early 1960s. When the baby boomers get around to saving up for retirement, you’re going to see a lot of investment scams.
See also: baby, boomer

boomer

verb

boomer

1. n. a laborer who moves from one economic boom to another. Fred’s great uncle was a boomer in the days of the Oklahoma oil rush.
2. Go to (baby) boomer.

thunder-boomer

n. a thunderstorm. There will be thunder-boomers in the boonies tonight.

baby boomer

One of approximately 77 million persons born during the two decades following the end of World War II (1945). In 1951, a New York Post columnist Sylvia Porter is thought to have been the first to call the large postwar increase in births a “boom.” The return of veterans and the expansion of the economy with higher incomes are some of the factors accounting for the increase. Healthier and wealthier than previous generations, the baby boomers to some extent rejected traditional values and embraced social and cultural change. Their identity as a group was indicated by Time magazine’s choice of the Baby Boom Generation as its 1966 “Man of the Year.” Aging baby boomers, so characterized after they reached the age of 40, are still named by the cliché. A June 13, 2010, article by Patricia Cohen in the New York Times said, “Baby boomers have long been considered the generation that did not want to grow up, perpetual adolescents even as they become eligible for Social Security.”
See also: baby, boomer
References in periodicals archive ?
* Brick-and-mortar is far from dead; 82 percent of Gen Xers and 82 percent of boomers surveyed buy in-store at least monthly.
The data also shows how chances of hitting old age have been far better for World War Two baby boomers.
In addition, only 32% of boomers said uncertainty about their financial future made it hard to know when they could stop working, compared with 50% who said they were unsure about when they could retire, if ever, in 2010.
It may be too late for boomers to take advantage of the powers of compounding interest, but with sound advice and good financial guidance, is there hope that boomers can leave behind regrets and gain confidence in their financial future?
Part of the reason for this is that the sweet spot for marketers has always been consumers in the 18- to 49-year-old range, and Baby Boomers--who range in age from 52 to 70--fall outside of that demographic, explains Anne-Marie Kovacs, principal and chief marketing officer at Boombox Networks, a Chicago-based marketing agency dedicated exclusively to Baby Boomers.
As the aging demographic enters retirement, baby boomers still carry a significant amount of financial clout.
Boomers are uniquely united in their belief that their choices "matter"; therefore, their shifting approaches to food and well-being bear new economic and cultural opportunities.
Women Aged 60 to 68 More Engaged Than Other Boomers
The report adds that more than one-quarter (26 percent) of middle-income boomers who have a financial professional have investable assets of more than $500,000.
Most retired oldest boomers note that retirement matches their expectations (76 percent).
For this research, SymphonyIRI breaks the group into two segments: older boomers (born 19461955) and younger boomers (born 19561964) to capture their distinct cultural experiences, lifestyles and attitudes.
As boomers retire in unprecedented numbers over the course of the next 30 years or so (does anyone doubt a significant percentage of boomers will still be working into their late 70s?), we will certainly see profound changes in how retirements are spent--and financed.
For starters, Boomers don't want to feel old, and far too many services and products already are aimed at Boomer maladies and conundrums.
TELECOMWORLDWIRE-March 4, 2011-Navigate Boomer Media appoints new southeast sales director(C)1994-2011 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.m2.com
Boomer, our 120-pound yellow Lab, was well trained by Brad as a hunting dog.