bonk

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bonk

1. To hit or strike someone or oneself on the head. A: "How you'd get that knot on your head, John?" B: "Oh, I bonked it on the door a few days ago." I can't believe that ball bonked Mom right on the head! I guess this is why we're not supposed to play ball in the house.
2. To hit or strike someone or something. I must have bonked my arm at some point—look at that bruise!
3. vulgar slang To have sex. I heard that Katie and Brad bonked last night after leaving the bar together.

bonk

(bɔŋk)
1. tv. to strike one’s head. He bonked his head on the shelf.
2. tv. to strike someone on the head. I bonked John on the head.
3. tv. & in. to copulate [with] someone. (Usually objectionable.) She bonked him all night. At least that’s what he said.
References in periodicals archive ?
The significance of Jonathan Bonk's academic career and scholarship has not been limited to his own direct literary output, which is well known and widely respected.
Jonathan Bonk's doctoral dissertation, "The Theory and Practice of Missionary Identification, 1860-1920," was published in 1989 by Edwin Mellen Press.
The presentations and responses were published simultaneously in Korean and English editions, edited by Bonk, under the title Accountability in Missions: Korean and Global Case Studies (2011).
The book Family Accountability in Missions: Korean and Western Case Studies, again in Korean and English editions and edited by Bonk, appeared in 2013.
Possessed of an agile mind, wide-ranging interests, and a ready wit; an avid reader able to converse on a wide range of topics; personally disciplined, engaged, and able to generate enthusiasm for projects he espouses, Jonathan Bonk has shown himself to be a natural leader, but one who takes the job of leading seriously and works at fulfilling the role well.
To Jon Bonk, mission does not wear just one face; it is multifaceted and calls for the development of thoughtful, informed, and robust frameworks for theological and missiological thought and for missional practice.
"Bonk played a major part in their great success over many years.
Watching Jonathan Bonk's life encouraged me to believe in the possibility of making intergenerational and intercultural connections.
Bonk at the Yale-Edinburgh Group on the History of the Missionary Movement and World Christianity in Edinburgh in the late 1990s, I knew it was more than a casual acquaintance.
Jonathan Bonk did not hesitate to support our initiative, which encouraged missionaries and scholars to come together to talk about issues related to mission studies.
This is a mystery, and it is profoundly embodied in the lives and work of Jonathan and Jean Bonk. This was my epiphany at OMSC, and it has dominated my research projects, writing, speeches, and perceptions of the world.
I call Jonathan Bonk Asiwaju--front-runner and natural leader.