boiling point


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boiling point

1. One's limit in patience, temper, or equanimity, after which one loses control of one's emotions. Likened to the temperature at which a given liquid boils. I was at my boiling point with the kids last night. All their fighting and shouting drove me crazy!
2. The point at which a situation becomes critical, calamitous, or uncontrollable. Tensions in the region are at their boiling point—full-scale war seems inevitable now.
See also: boiling, point

boiling point

A climax or crisis; a high degree of fury, excitement, or outrage. For example, The union's disgust with management has reached the boiling point. This metaphoric term alludes to the temperature at which water boils. [Second half of 1700s]
2. have a low boiling point. Become angry quite readily, as in Don't tease her anymore-she has a low boiling point. This phrase means that it takes less heat than usual for a boiling point to be reached. [First half of 1800s] Also see boil over; make one's blood boil.
See also: boiling, point
References in periodicals archive ?
Only by testing the boiling point can the real cause be identified.
The significant difference in material properties between water-based and alcohol-based fluxes is the change in the boiling point of the solvent in the flux system.
Boiling Point obscures this ongoing debate by repeatedly appealing to a nonexistent scientific consensus.
In Boiling Point Gelbspan recounts how in the early 1990s Big Coal and Big Oil mounted a campaign of disinformation designed to persuade policymakers, the press, and the public that the issue of human-induced climate change was mired in scientific uncertainty.
The boiling point of water is -- [degrees]C, or -- [degrees]F.
Slowly bring to boiling point, gently stirring occassionally to make sure that the sugar has dissolved.
By the early 1960s, the Civil Rights Movement that began shortly after the Civil War had reached a boiling point.
This quick-acting blackener is a liquid version of the company's standard compound and has an exceptionally low boiling point of 250[degrees] to 260[degrees]F.
His bestselling books, including Politics of Rich and Poor, The Emerging Republican Majority, Boiling Point, and Arrogant Capital: Washington, Wall Street and the Frustration of American Politics, were benchmarks of the latest political shifts.
TerraTherm uses a technique called in situ thermal destruction in which the soil is heated to well beyond the boiling point of water using electrically powered heating elements.
One current focus at NIST is on the dispersion and distribution of CF3I at temperatures below its normal boiling point (-22 [degrees]C).
Also HFC-245fa offers a broader processing window due to it slower boiling point.
Today's reference points, the boiling point of water (100[degrees] C) and the melting point of ice (0[degrees] C), were by no means as obvious in the past as they now seem.
THE Second Division promotion race reaches boiling point this afternoon - but Millwall boss Mark McGhee couldn't care less.
A cooling system using the Evans technology uses a nonwater-based high boiling point (over 350[degrees]F) coolant and controls the temperature of the coolant substantially below its boiling point.