boiled


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Related to boiled: boiled dinner, Boiled Eggs

boil (something) away

To boil a liquid for so long that it evaporates. If you don't put the pasta in the pot soon, you will boil all of the water away.
See also: away, boil

boil down

1. Literally, to reduce the amount of a liquid in a container through boiling. A noun can be used between "boil" and "down" or after "down." You'll get a better, more condensed flavor when you boil down the stock. The sauce will thicken when you boil it down.
2. To reduce or simplify (something) to the most basic, essential, or fundamental element(s). Your essay is far too long. Please try to cut out any superfluous text and boil it down to about 10 pages. The issue really boils down to whether customers will be willing to pay more for the same product or not.
See also: boil, down

boil (something) out of (something)

To use boiling water to clean a substance (such as a stain) from an item. Do you know if can you boil grass stains out of cotton?
See also: boil, of, out

boil over

1. Literally, of a liquid, to boil so vigorously that it flows out of its container. If you put too much water in the pot, it might boil over.
2. To become extremely intense or out of control, especially after a period or escalation. Usually said of emotions. Things had been tense between my aunts for months, and those feelings finally boiled over in a yelling match on our family vacation. This protest is in danger of reaching a point where it boils over into a violent confrontation.
See also: boil, over

boil up

1. To prepare food in boiling water. A noun can be used between "boil" and "up" or after "up." I'm just boiling up some pasta for dinner—it will be ready soon.
2. To increase in strength and intensity. Things had been tense between my aunts for a while, but those feelings really boiled up when they were forced to be together for days on our family vacation.
See also: boil, up

boil with (an emotion)

To express or feel an emotion, typically anger, very intensely. Things are often tense between my mom and my aunt, so when they had to spend days together on our family vacation, they were soon boiling with anger. When I saw that someone had backed into my new car, I immediately boiled with rage.
See also: boil

hard-boiled

1. Literally, having reached a solid state through boiling, as of eggs. Mom is making hard-boiled eggs for breakfast.
2. Tough and dispassionate; hardened by experience. My brother, the hard-boiled police officer, becomes a gushing fool if you ask him about his baby daughter.

boil over

[for a liquid] to overflow while being boiled. (See also boil over (with something).) The sauce boiled over and dripped onto the stove. Don't let the stew boil over!
See also: boil, over

boil over (with something)

Fig. [for someone] to erupt in great anger. The boss boiled over with anger. Things got out of hand and the crowd's passions boiled over.
See also: boil, over

boil something down

 
1. Lit. to condense or thicken something, such as a liquid. I have to boil this gravy down for a while before I can serve it. You boil down the sauce and I'll set the table.
2. Fig. to reduce a problem to its simple essentials. If we could boil this problem down to its essentials, we might be able to solve it. We don't have time to boil down this matter. This is too urgent.
See also: boil, down

boil something up

Rur. to cook a batch of food by boiling. She boiled some beans up for dinner. She boiled up some potatoes.
See also: boil, up

boil down

1. Simplify, summarize, or shorten, as in John finally managed to boil his thesis down to 200 pages.
2. boil down to. Be reducible to basic elements, be equivalent to. For example, What this issue boils down to is that the council doesn't want to spend more money. These metaphoric usages allude to reducing and concentrating a substance by boiling off liquid. [Late 1800s]
See also: boil, down

boil over

Erupt in anger, excitement, or other strong emotion. For example, The mere mention of a tax increase will make Kevin boil over. This phrase alludes to overflowing while boiling. [Second half of 1800s]
See also: boil, over

boil down

v.
1. To make an amount of liquid or food less in quantity or more concentrated by boiling it: You can boil down the leftover juices and make a nice sauce. The soup seemed thin, so I boiled it down.
2. To condense something to its bare essentials; summarize: I boiled down my long report into a short two-page report. This plan is too long for me to read; can you boil it down for me?
3. To have something as a basic or root cause: All of the complaints at work boil down to a lack of good leadership.
See also: boil, down

boil over

v.
1. To rise and flow over the sides of a container while boiling. Used of a liquid: I turned up the heat too high and the soup boiled over.
2. To erupt in violent anger: When I realized I had been robbed, I boiled over and started yelling.
See also: boil, over

boil up

v.
1. To prepare some food by boiling it: I boiled up some lobster for supper. Let's boil the potatoes up and fry them with ham.
2. To grow rapidly and steadily; escalate: Hostilities have been boiling up all over that part of the world.
See also: boil, up

boiled

1. mod. angry. Now, don’t get boiled. It was only a joke.
2. mod. alcohol intoxicated. How can you get so boiled on wine?
References in periodicals archive ?
It's hard to beat a good old-fashioned breakfast of boiled egg and soldiers but sometimes it's a bit of a faff waiting for water to boil and timing your toast.
The maximum compression stress values were reported as the hardness (H) of boiled shrimp.
We had the same trouble until we learned that all future hard boiled eggs must be left on the counter for a week (no refrigeration), then boil any way you want.
Prepare extra boiled potatoes and roast them in a very hot oven, approximately 450 degrees.
Derham plans to look for a different chemical, oxalic acid, which is an organic by-product of fermentation of boiled pepper berries.
3 minutes for really soft boiled yolk and set white
Cooking Green Vitamin A[*] Vitamin C Calcium[dagger] (IU) (mg) (mg) Beet, fresh, boiled 5,100 25 114 Collards, fresh, boiled 3,129 18.
Our first venture into sugaring was a stove-top operation: sap boiled on the kitchen range to produce two or three quarts for our own use.
After three weeks run-in period during which they all consumed filtered coffee, the participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups receiving four to six cups of boiled coffee a day, four to six cups of filtered coffee a day, or no coffee, for nine weeks.
It is better that young infants and pregnant women use bottled or stored water instead of boiled tap water whenever possible for drinking and cooking.
Dishes should be washed using boiled water if possible, but it is probably sufficient to rinse washed dishes with boiled and cooled water before they are dried.
Water should also be boiled before being given to pets, according to the DEP.
Water stored in the five-gallon plastic containers still needs to be boiled before using, and eventually gets stale.
EGGS could soon be boiled perfectly every time - thanks to two new hi-tech solutions to runny whites and rock-solid yolks.
Boiled sweets may be going out of fashion among younger generations.