bodkin


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

sit bodkin

obsolete To be squeezed tightly between two people while traveling, especially in a carriage. Pressed for time ahead of his appointment, the Duke was rather unceremoniously obliged to sit bodkin between the two daughters of his host.
See also: bodkin, sit

ride bodkin

obsolete To be squeezed tightly between two people while traveling, especially in a carriage. Pressed for time ahead of his appointment, the Duke was rather unceremoniously obliged to ride bodkin between the two daughters of his host.
See also: bodkin, ride

odds bodkins

antiquated A minced oath for "God's body," expressing surprise, shock, or astonishment. Odds bodkins, the bill for dinner is nearly $200!
See also: bodkin, odds

ride bodkin

travel squeezed between two other people. dated
See also: bodkin, ride

odd's bodkins

An archaic interjection meaning “God's body.” In an era where people respected the Ten Commandments a lot more than we do today, the injuncTion against taking the name of the Lord in vain led to a variety of euphemisms. One involved using the word “bodkins,” the tools that shoemakers and other leatherworkers use to pierce holes, for “body.” The most convincing explanation is that “bodkins” sounds a lot like “body,” but there's no explanation for the plural. Therefore, when a cobbler hit his thumb while resoling a shoe, he was likely to wince and exclaim, “Odd's bodkins,” if not something worse. Henry Fielding was the first author to use the phrase in close to its present form in his Don Quixote in England: “Odsbodlikins . . . you have a strange sort of a taste.” Similar oaths that avoided naming the diety used “'s” as an abbreviation of “God's,” such as “s'wounds,” “s'blood,” and “s'truth.” However, it's unlikely that Ira Gershwin had that in mind when he wrote the lyrics to “S'Wonderful.”
See also: bodkin
References in periodicals archive ?
Various ceramics, such as pots, jugs and pans and also the remains of bones, pipes, a bone bodkin and needles but also tiny metal findings were unearthed.
- Attach a safety pin (or bodkin) to the end of the elastic and thread the elastic through the other 'channel' created in step 1.
It is understood Elizabeth I was interrupted to appoint a high sheriff during needlework and, having nothing to write with, angrily stabbed the parchment with a bodkin.
Bodkin updated us on progress towards ENs becoming registered Accident Compensation Corporation treatment providers.
"Bodkins of this type were popular in the Low Countries and appear in household inventories as well as on female portraits," said Portable Antiquities.
They testified that Dr Bodkin Adams would, on a fairly regular basis, inject his patients with large doses--apparently excessive doses--of drugs such as morphine and heroin in order to alleviate the pain.
"Mixing literature and an adventurous horseback expedition with a real insight into modern-day Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories makes for a very appealing, multi-faceted adventure," concluded Bodkin.
Bodkin, led by Maren Rinaldi as managing member of the Maren & John Rinaldi Revocable Trust, bought the property from Tom and Nina Luther of Fayetteville.
Tom Bodkin has been named creative director; previously, he'd been deputy managing editor for three years.
In the early years, I used Bodkin, Howard Hill and several other broadheads.
The idea began with Christopher Bodkin, who works full time as a data entry coordinator for the Healthier Hospitals Initiative, a national campaign involving a coalition of major health care systems and hospitals, including UMass Memorial.
The Queen then used a silver bodkin to "prick" his name which was on a list written on parchment of all new high sheriffs for England and Wales.
Skinny jeans will look fab worn with the quirky Bodkin Beach Wine Patent shoe - PS69.99 at Clarks.
Tom Bodkin has been promoted to deputy managing editor and has also assumed the role as the company's design director.
The Curious Habits Of Doctor Adams: a 1950s Murder Mystery by Jane Robins (John Murray, PS20, ebook PS10.99) IN the sedate Sussex coastal town of Eastbourne in the 1950s, where a quarter of the population was retired, the support provided by Dr John Bodkin Adams sparked rumours for more than 20 years.