bob


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bits and bobs

Sundry little items, tasks, or chores. Primarily heard in UK. I'm almost finished, I just have a few bits and bobs to do around the house before we leave. I never thought it would take me this long to pack, but I have so many bits and bobs scattered around the house!
See also: and, bit, bob

bob up

1. Literally, to move up into view above the surface of something. Otters often bob up in this part of the harbor, so it's a great place to take photographs.
2. To appear, arise, or come into being quickly and/or unexpectedly. We thought the meeting was over until several questions bobbed up from the back row. The city is deceptively small, and acquaintances often bob up at the most unexpected places.
See also: bob, up

Two Bob

1. slang A 10-pence coin. Typically capitalized. Primarily heard in UK. Grandma gave me a Two Bob for my birthday!
2. slang A 20-cent coin. Primarily heard in Australia. Grandma gave me a two bob for my birthday!
See also: bob, two

be not short of a bob or two

To be wealthy. (A "bob" is another name for a shilling.) Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I hear her father is not short of a bob or two, so I wouldn't be too worried about her future.
See also: bob, not, of, short, two

Bob's your uncle

A phrase used to emphasize how easily or quickly something can be done. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. All you have to do is combine all of the ingredients in one pot, let it cook, and then Bob's your uncle, dinner is ready!
See also: uncle

bob and weave

To move quickly up and down and side to side, typically in an attempt to evade someone or something. You need to bob and weave more so that your opponent can't hit you.
See also: and, bob, weave

true as Bob

Truly; according to fact. Primarily heard in South Africa. True as Bob, we've been using the same formula since my great-grandfather started the company 125 years ago. Here's a story for you, true as Bob, about the largest fish I'd ever caught.
See also: bob, true

BOB

An abbreviation for "bug-out bag," a bag containing things that would allow one to evacuate and survive in an emergency or disaster situation, often for a minimum of 72 hours. Typical contents include food and water, a first-aid kit, extra clothing, necessary medication, and maps. To "bug out" is a slang term meaning to leave in a hurry. When the hurricane hit, I was very glad that my parents always made us keep a BOB at the ready.

been bobbing for fries

A phrase used to convey that someone has a hideous face (as if they had put their face in a deep-fryer to pull out fries with their teeth). That guy's so ugly, it's like he's been bobbing for fries!
See also: been, bob, fries

bob up

Appear suddenly or unexpectedly. For example, I didn't know anyone in the group until Harry bobbed up. This term uses the verb bob in the sense of "to bounce," a usage dating from Chaucer's day. [Late 1800s]
See also: bob, up

Bob's your uncle

BRITISH
You can say Bob's your uncle to show that something is easy and quick to achieve. You just tag along with a teacher for a while, and in a year, Bob's your uncle, you are a teacher too. If the boiler ever gets too hot, the safety valve releases all the excess steam, and Bob's your uncle. No problem. Note: This expression dates back to a political scandal in Britain in 1886. The Prime Minister Robert Cecil gave his nephew the position of Chief Secretary for Ireland, and many people criticized him for this. The name `Bob' is short for `Robert'.
See also: uncle

bob and weave

make rapid bodily movements up and down and from side to side.
See also: and, bob, weave

Bob's your uncle

everything is fine; problem solved. British informal
Bob is a familiar form of the name Robert . The origin of the phrase is often said to be in the controversial appointment in 1887 of the young Arthur Balfour to the important post of Chief Secretary for Ireland by his uncle Lord Salisbury , whose first name was Robert . The problem with this explanation is that the phrase is not recorded until the 1930s.
1996 Colin Bateman Of Wee Sweetie Mice and Men I couldn't believe how easy it was to get. Just walked into a shop, signed a piece of paper, and Bob's your uncle.
See also: uncle

true as Bob (or God)

absolutely true. South African informal
See also: bob, true

(and) Bob’s your ˈuncle

(British English, informal) often used after explaining how to do something, solve a problem, etc. to emphasize how easy it is: To make the alarm go off at the right time, you just press this button, set the clock, and Bob’s your uncle! Bob is a short form of the name ‘Robert’. This phrase might refer to the prime minister Robert Cecil. In 1887 he unexpectedly decided to give an important government position to his nephew, who was not considered a very important politician.
See also: uncle

bob up

v.
To come to the surface quickly, especially after being underneath for a short time: I didn't think anyone else was swimming in the pond, but then someone's head bobbed up right in front of me.
See also: bob, up

been bobbing for fries

phr. [has] a really ugly face. (As if badly burned.) Look at that face. Been bobbing for fries, I guess.
See also: been, bob, fries
References in classic literature ?
But at this moment Yap, who had been running on before, returned barking to the scene of action, and saw a favorable opportunity for biting Bob's bare leg not only with inpunity but with honor.
Bob took the halfpenny out of his pocket, and threw it away from him on the ground.
I sha'n't go along with you any more," he added, turning round homeward, not without casting a regret toward the rat-catching and other pleasures which he must relinquish along with Bob's society.
"You may let it alone, then," Bob called out after him.
"Go along wi' you, then, wi' your drowned dog; I wouldn't own such a dog-- I wouldn't," said Bob, getting louder, in a last effort to sustain his defiance.
An' there's your horn-handed knife, then as you gi'en me." Here Bob flung the knife as far as he could after Tom's retreating footsteps.
The knife would do not good on the ground there; it wouldn't vex Tom; and pride or resentment was a feeble passion in Bob's mind compared with the love of a pocket-knife.
THE POB ARRIVES DURING the Noughties, the sleek bob was still at the forefront of on-trend hairstyles, worn by the likes of Mary J Blige and Rihanna in the music video for her hit single, Umbrella.
1920s BRING ON THE FLICK DURING this period, fashion was conservative, the bob's length reached the jawline, and was less wavy and more structured.
Bob's four years of service as a bandsman was just the beginning of a musical career that would span more than fifty years, and end with reporters calling him, "one of Winnipeg's most celebrated composers and conductors" (1) upon his death on 3 January 1995.
The High Bob, named after the inventor, Bob Fleming, is a toolbox that attaches to the side of an aerial lift, making tools and equipment readily available as well as providing ease in running wire.
Golden Gate Capital acquired Bob Evans Restaurants for USD 565m plus assumption of certain net working capital liabilities.
That happened when Pat was an incoming Smith College freshman working as a camp counselor in New Hampshire and Bob, a Dartmouth sophomore, was hiking on Mount Moosilauke.
Bob inspired then Tory leader Iain Duncan Smith to set up the Centre for Social Justice, a think tank who campaigned to improve the lives of the poor, after his 2002 visit to Bob's Easterhouse project in Glasgow.
And he's due to appear opposite real-life wife Stephanie Dooley, who has signed up to play Lothario Bob's missus, Michelle.