boast

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Related to boastfulness: bragger

boast about (someone or something)

To speak proudly of someone or something, perhaps to an excessive or unwarranted degree. You're my daughter, and you have such good grades—of course I'm going to boast about you! He keeps boasting about his heroic actions, but he really didn't have that big of a role in the rescue efforts. Jim is boasting about getting the promotion, but the boss hasn't officially awarded it yet.
See also: boast

boast of (someone or something)

To speak proudly of someone or something, perhaps to an excessive or unwarranted degree. You're my daughter, and you are at the top of the class—of course I'm going to boast of you! He keeps boasting of his heroic actions, but he really didn't have that big of a role in the rescue efforts. Jim is boasting of getting the promotion, but the boss hasn't officially awarded it yet.
See also: boast, of

not anything to boast about

1. adjective Not especially impressive, remarkable, or noteworthy; rather dull, mediocre, uninteresting, or unimportant. The new sushi restaurant in town gets good reviews, but it isn't anything to boast about in my opinion. His performance hasn't been anything to boast about so far. To be honest, we were expecting much more out of him when we recruited him.
2. noun Nothing impressive, remarkable, or noteworthy. There's not really anything to boast about in this town, honestly. We've got a couple of crummy strip malls and a rundown movie theater, and that's about it. I've been looking through your portfolio, but so far, I haven't seen anything to boast about.
See also: anything, boast, not, to

not much to boast about

1. adjective Not especially impressive, remarkable, or noteworthy; rather dull, mediocre, uninteresting, or unimportant. It gets good reviews, but the new sushi restaurant in town is really not much to boast about. His performance has so far been not much to boast about. To be honest, we were expecting much more out of him when we recruited him.
2. noun Not very much that is impressive, remarkable, or noteworthy. There's not much to boast about in this town, to be honest. We've got a couple of crummy strip malls and a rundown movie theater, and that's about it. I've been looking through your portfolio, but so far, I haven't seen much to boast about.
See also: boast, much, not, to

nothing to boast about

1. adjective Not especially impressive, remarkable, or noteworthy; rather dull, mediocre, uninteresting, or unimportant. It gets good reviews, but the new sushi restaurant in town is really nothing to boast about. His performance has so far been nothing to boast about. To be honest, we were expecting much more out of him when we recruited him.
2. noun Nothing impressive, remarkable, or noteworthy. There's nothing to boast about in this town, to be honest. We've got a couple of crummy strip malls and a rundown movie theater, and that's about it. I've been looking through your portfolio, but so far, I have seen nothing to boast about.
See also: boast, nothing, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

boast about someone or something

 and boast of someone or something
to speak highly about someone or something that one is proud of. I just have to boast about my grandchildren. Do you mind? Is he boasting about his car again? I don't like to boast of what I did.
See also: boast

nothing to boast about

not worth bragging about; mediocre. In high school, my grades were acceptable, but they were nothing to boast about. Jill: Does this town have a good library? Nancy: It's nothing to boast about.
See also: boast, nothing, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Congen ( consul general Calcutta) comments that Nath speaks with such brashness, boastfulness, and at times niave ( sic) simplicity that one tends to discount it all...
We admired his bravado and his boastfulness. That's why he was revered rather than reviled when he announced he was 'A Special One'.
Winston Churchill called this the 'How Bill Adams won the Battle of Waterloo' genre: 'written in a spirit of gross boastfulness', to show how important the author was, 'how invariably he was right, and how much more he could tell if only his mouth was not what he was pleased to call, closed'.
This would look like arrogance and boastfulness, i.e.
"Too much self-deprecating humour can be a form of boastfulness," interjected the Philosopher, his saintly blue gaze reaching into the distance.
Besides, there is a local social culture that has produced the phenomenon of "pride" and boastfulness, whereby some citizens pride themselves with the number of workers they have, in reference to a "high" social and economic status.
Participants (N = 14) acting as independent judges rated the photos on 8-point scales (not at all factor to very factor) rating anger, sadness, resentment, happiness, remorse, boastfulness, fear, and criminality.
Ironically, many of the most cavalier of these anecdotes are supplied by a younger writer whose implicit boastfulness about his own sexual liberation comes at the expense of the better-known older figure.
His matter-of-fact response to the season is typical of a team who have not allowed their wounded pride to turn into boastfulness this year.
Switch on Sky Sports 3, though, and you'll soon realise that life is definitely worth living as 48 greyhounds joyfully put on a spectacular show, exhibiting no pretensions, boastfulness or ostentation in the process.
There's a boastfulness in his future-facing certainty that his poem will live long as "eyes can see" a braggadocio that puts death in its place.
(This may be the one most disturbing aspect of an otherwise well-conceived satire.) In certain ways he does resemble his father: sneering boastfulness, shallow sexuality, arrogance, domineering stance.
In his marginal note, Chapman remarks upon "Ulysses' continued insolence" as he persists in taunting his defeated adversary, explaining that Odysseus bellows out his true name several times not simply "to repeate what he said to the Cyclop" but rather "to let his hearers know his Epithetes, and estimation in the world," a boastfulness that is, perhaps, the inescapable partner of Odysseus' irony and obliquity (166).
One look at the spread of Alabama's distance learning program supports Heard's boastfulness. ACCESS (Alabama Connecting Classrooms, Educators, and Students Statewide; http://accessdl.state.al.us) has grown from 24 pilot sites since its January 2006 launch to 170 sites in spring 2008.