blubber


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blubber gut(s)

A pejorative term for one who is obese. Before sticking to a healthy diet and exercise routine, I was a real blubber guts.
See also: blubber

blubber gut(s)

(ˈbləbɚ ˈgət(s))
n. a fat person. (Also a rude term of address.) Why doesn’t that blubber gut do something about all that weight?
See also: blubber, gut

blubber gut

verb
See also: blubber, gut
References in periodicals archive ?
PCBs remain the highest chemical contaminant in the whales' blubber, and are known to disrupt the whales' reproductive, endocrine, thyroid and immune systems, harm their brains and trigger cancer.
By Friday, a crew of about 10 volunteers had removed most of the blubber, which was the relatively easy part of the job, Stevenson said.
To examine variability of blubber thickness in belugas, I measured blubber depths along five half-girth widths and from 15 other body locations selected on the basis of previously published blubber thickness measurements from belugas in Hudson Bay and the body locations where emaciated harbour porpoises (.Phocoena phocoena) lost the most blubber (Doidge, 1990; Koopman et al., 2002).
It seems most of us frolicking in the water, with blubber or without, remain safe.
Ask a Research Question: What role does blubber play in helping polar animals survive?
HThis week I found myself forced to look up the word blubber and have decided to share my findings with you.
The authors used immunochemistry to analyze CYP1A1 expression in skin and blubber samples collected from 234 sperm whales from five Pacific Ocean regions.
The group of harbour seals at Tynemouth's Blue Reef Aquarium have been put on double rations to help build up their blubber to cope with the wintry weather.
Stomach and intestine contents, teeth, skin and blubber samples were taken and preserved.
She'll moan about her weight in the Press, have the blubber sucked out in surgery, reveal her new body in a mag deal...
Naturally this is an American discovery, the Americans having the largest reserves of blubber on the planet.
Why would I choose to spend my years graduate school up to my elbows in foul-smelling whale blubber? To explore how some of the most notorious man-made pollutants reach dangerous concentrations in large predators, even when concentrations of these pollutants in seawater are low and considered "safe."
I was certainly no hero and continued to blubber away.
Dear EarthTalk: It is true that the carcasses of whales that wash up on shore are considered dangerous to humans because of the amount of toxins and chemicals in their blubber? --Michael O'Loughlin, Tigard, OR