blow smoke

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blow smoke

1. Literally, to expel smoke from one's mouth, as while smoking a cigarette, cigar, etc. Ew, don't blow smoke in my face!
2. To smoke marijuana. My little brother has no aspirations of going to college—he'd much rather blow smoke with his friends all day.
3. To intentionally mislead. I think they're blowing smoke about giving regular raises to their employees—I couldn't find any evidence to support that claim.
See also: blow, smoke
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

blow smoke

mainly AMERICAN
If someone blows smoke they deliberately confuse or deceive you. I just can't shake the feeling that he's up to something. Sounds to me like he's blowing smoke. Note: You can also say that someone blows smoke in your face or blows smoke in your eyes with the same meaning. He's being misled. They are blowing smoke in his face.
See also: blow, smoke
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

blow ˈsmoke (up somebody’s asstaboo)

(American English, slang) try to trick somebody or lie to somebody, particularly by saying that something is better than it really is: I won’t blow smoke up your ass. Your product is OK but I’ve seen better.
See also: blow, smoke
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

blow smoke

1. tv. to state something in a way that conceals the truth. (see also smoke and mirrors.) She is a master at blowing smoke. She belongs in government.
2. tv. to smoke marijuana. (Drugs.) Frank sits around blowing smoke when he’s not selling.
See also: blow, smoke
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

blow smoke

1. To speak deceptively.
2. To brag or exaggerate.
See also: blow, smoke
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
When he digs out a player they must come away wondering whether he has just coated them or blown smoke up their backside!
He expressed concern that his urine might show the effect of passive absorption, as an acquaintance had, he said, blown smoke from a marijuana joint in his face a couple of days before," tribunal documents said.
South-southwesterly winds have blown smoke from fires in central and south Sumatra to Singapore and Malaysia, obscuring sunlight and reducing temperatures and visibility.
Cadete thought Michael Nanan had blown smoke in his face, Newcastle Crown Court heard.