blow smoke

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blow smoke

1. Literally, to expel smoke from one's mouth, as while smoking a cigarette, cigar, etc. Ew, don't blow smoke in my face!
2. To smoke marijuana. My little brother has no aspirations of going to college—he'd much rather blow smoke with his friends all day.
3. To intentionally mislead. I think they're blowing smoke about giving regular raises to their employees—I couldn't find any evidence to support that claim.
See also: blow, smoke
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

blow smoke

mainly AMERICAN
If someone blows smoke they deliberately confuse or deceive you. I just can't shake the feeling that he's up to something. Sounds to me like he's blowing smoke. Note: You can also say that someone blows smoke in your face or blows smoke in your eyes with the same meaning. He's being misled. They are blowing smoke in his face.
See also: blow, smoke
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

blow ˈsmoke (up somebody’s asstaboo)

(American English, slang) try to trick somebody or lie to somebody, particularly by saying that something is better than it really is: I won’t blow smoke up your ass. Your product is OK but I’ve seen better.
See also: blow, smoke
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

blow smoke

1. tv. to state something in a way that conceals the truth. (see also smoke and mirrors.) She is a master at blowing smoke. She belongs in government.
2. tv. to smoke marijuana. (Drugs.) Frank sits around blowing smoke when he’s not selling.
See also: blow, smoke
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

blow smoke

1. To speak deceptively.
2. To brag or exaggerate.
See also: blow, smoke
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Especially when it's blowing smoke, funneled through a smoke machine inside the shop, next to a giant U.S.
Watville Primary School was closed on Tuesday and will remain shut until today because of winds blowing smoke towards the school site from Middlemore Industrial Estate, where the blaze broke out last Wednesday.
It's not about blowing smoke into the team and telling us all how great we are."
Three years ago, the Botevgrad landfill was blowing smoke daily.
She wasn't just huffing, puffing and blowing smoke. As resident director of the "How To Train Your Dragon Live Spectacular" touring show that comes to the DCU Center for eight performances today through Sunday, Lavin oversees a massive production that includes Vikings and 23 flying dragons, some with wingspans of up to 46 feet, that can indeed blow smoke and fire.
In Blowing Smoke: Rethinking the War on Drugs without Prohibition and Rehab (Rowman & Littlefield), Michael Reznicek shows how such language reinforces the logic of drug prohibition by implying that people cannot help themselves.
It's difficult to decide which is more inconsiderate - the insistence of parents to drive to within a few yards of the school gates - whatever the danger to other pedestrians and children - or patients and visitors leaning against large 'no smoking' signs nonchalantly blowing smoke over anyone passing through the hospital reception area, despite a designated smoking facility only 25 yards away.
A kids' party staged by Babel turned sour when a children's entertainer dressed as Spongebob removed his face covering to light a cigarette, started blowing smoke in the children's faces, then revealed he had recently been released from jail!
There are also several cartoons and photos of mothers blowing smoke into infants' faces.
I guess blowing smoke is what politicians do, even those who got elected in November on the claims they would change things in Washington.
She is also seen standing over the helpless male, blowing smoke in his face.
Every second young woman must have been blowing smoke into the air thinking they were so cool.
For this reason, I suspect the majority of people you quote in the article who suggest that saving energy and materials is a worthy end in itself are just blowing smoke and that in the final analysis their goals are really no different than ours were.
Alex Newman, one of your NEW AMERICAN writers, is blowing smoke about autoworkers' wages without knowing the facts ("Auto Bailout: Lemon or Lemonade?" January 5 issue).
It's during great adversity that certain things become very clear: who has been "blowing smoke" and who has "stickability." The companies that will succeed in 2009 are those that have a solid business plan and market-driven products, all mixed with a generous measure of perseverance.