blowed


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Related to blowed: blown, blew

blow away

1. Of the wind, to blow someone or something away from its current location. Our trashcans were blown away in that bad storm, and we finally found them down the street in our neighbor's yard. I was almost blown away on my walk to the library because it's so windy out!
2. To thoroughly impress, overwhelm, or excite. In this usage, a noun can be used between "blow" and "away." The show of support from everyone just blew me away. I was blown away by how good that movie was!
3. slang To kill someone, especially with gunfire or an explosive device. Ray blew away the informant, just as the boss told him to.
4. To defeat an opponent easily and/or by a wide margin. In this usage, a noun can used between "blow" and "away." The final score was 17-1? Wow, we really blew that team away! I have a feeling the top-ranked team is just going to blow away any opponent they face.
See also: away, blow

blown away

1. Thoroughly impressed, overwhelmed, or excited by something. I am blown away by the show of support from everyone. I was blown away by how good that movie was!
2. Intoxicated, either by drugs or alcohol. Do you remember last night at the bar at all? You were really blown away!
3. Killed by gunfire. Two guys were blown away in your building tonight, and you don't know anything about it?
See also: away, blown

(Well,) I'll be blowed!

old-fashioned An expression of surprise or astonishment, especially regarding some recent revelation. A: "You know, if you run your washing machine at night, you can save a lot of money on your electric bill." B: "I'll be blowed, I didn't know that!" Well, I'll be blowed! Who knew so many people would show up to see our concert?

blowed (away)

slang Intoxicated, either by drugs or alcohol. Do you remember last night at the bar at all? You were really blowed! A: "Are those guys totally blowed away?" B: "Probably, they reek of weed."
See also: blowed

blow away

[for something light] to be carried away by the wind. The leaves blew away on the autumn winds. My papers blew away!
See also: away, blow

blow someone away

 
1. Sl. [for something shocking or exciting] to overwhelm a person; to excite a person very much. The amount of the check blew me away. The loud noise from the concert blew me away.
2. Sl. to murder someone, usually by gunfire. Mr. Big ordered Lefty to blow Max away. Max tried to blow Lefty away.
See also: away, blow

blow someone or something away

[for the wind] to carry someone or something away. The wind almost blew her away. It nearly blew away all the houses.
See also: away, blow

blow away

1. Kill, especially by gunshot or explosion. For example, The unit reported that the whole village was blown away. This usage became particularly widespread in the 1960s, during the Vietnam War. [Slang; early 1990s]
2. Overcome easily; defeat decisively. For example, Ann said the test would be easy; she would just blow it away, or Jim was sure his crew could blow away their opponents. [Slang; 1960s] Also see blow off, def. 5.
3. Impress greatly, overwhelm with surprise, delight, or shock, as in That music really blew me away. [Slang; c. 1970] Also see blow one's mind.
See also: away, blow

I'll be blowed

used to express surprise, annoyance, etc. informal
See also: blowed

blow away

v.
1. To be carried or pushed away by the force of moving air: I left the newspaper on the table and it blew away.
2. To carry or push something away by the force of moving air: The wind blows the fallen leaves away. The storm blew away all the laundry from the clothesline.
3. Slang To affect someone intensely in mind or emotion: Your wonderful new poems really blow me away. Their amazing performance blew away every member of the audience.
4. Slang To kill someone, especially with a firearm: The gang entered their rival's hideout, ready to blow away everyone. The thieves threatened to blow me away if I didn't tell them where I hid the money.
5. Slang To defeat someone or something decisively: The confident chess player blew away every challenger. The visiting soccer team was much better than our team and easily blew us away.
See also: away, blow

blowed (away)

mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. (see also blown away.) I was so blowed away I couldn’t see straight.
See also: away, blowed

blowed

verb

blown away

1. mod. dead; killed. (Underworld.) Four of the mob were already blown away when the cops got there.
2. and blown mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. Whatever that pill was, Cecilia is totally blown away. She’s blown and alone and making a groan.
3. mod. overwhelmed; greatly impressed. (Often with with or by.) We were just blown away by your good words.
See also: away, blown

blow away

Kill; also, surprise, impress, overwhelm. The first usage dates from the Vietnam War but it is the second, from the 1970s, that is more current today. The CBS television show This Morning had it on March 20, 1990: “We were just talking about how blown away we were by [violinist] Joshua Bell.” It is on its way to becoming a cliché. See also blow one's mind.
See also: away, blow
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter Three, "Thursday Night at Project Blowed," returns to an explicit focus on the Los Angeles hip hop underground with an ethnographic account of an evening at the freestyle workshop, contextualized within vividly-described neighborhood sights, sounds, and smells.
For Fud was born in 'aught-six, and when the Great Blizzard of 'fifty-seven blowed through New York in darkest March and buried the streets from Sheridan Square to Minton's and farther, the crews come out with their plows and shovels, and two days after, one truck turned the corner from Times Square onto 47th, and there on the left was a snow- bank big as Kelly's Stables with two legs sticking out at a angle in tuxedo pants.
Someone puts up a straw house, and the wolf blowed everything.
In another passage, Thoreau conveys the ocean's unsentimental and total dominion while simultaneously illustrating the inexplicable and infinite pattern of gains and losses that nature weaves and into which living creatures must accommodate themselves to forestall physical mortality: The light-house keeper said that when the wind blowed strong on to the shore, the waves ate fast into the bank....
The boy lets fly: "Well, see, I wuz just thinkin' 'bout the shame and humiliation I wuz feelin' while I watched you let your deputy git his brains blowed out, then seein' you git beat like an old rug in front'a all my friends and havin' ta realize that my Paw is nuthin' but a yellowbellied coward and how I gotta run away from home now so's nobody will know I'm yore son....
of tokens Nathan (SLI) felled 4 comed 3 catched 1 swimmed 1 Anne (MLU) bited 1 borned 1 hiddened 1 lied (instead of lay) 1 runned 1 thoughted 1 Becky (MLU) stealed 4 broked 2 comed 2 brokened 1 sawed 1 Carl (MLU) broked 8 comed 8 runned 3 catched 1 doned 1 falled 1 goned 1 Warren (MLU) comed 11 stucked 4 blowed 1 breaked 1 broked 1 Table 1.
In any case, in this translation, Sancho says things like: "I'll be blowed, gents, if the author of that book you've got there doesn't want to get on bad terms with me" (II, 59; 889).
"That million-dollar Buttrick order," he said, "is blowed up, gone with the wind, down the drain, and lost in the deep blue sea!
"They all think I'm going to die," she thought, "but I'm blowed if that's going to happen.
Sometimes, too, the message gets slipped in under the humor, as in "I knowed a man and he was foreman and he was so stingy that when three of his men on the job got blowed up, he docked 'em for the time they was up in the air." A comic commentary on a man who has sold out, it is also a reminder of the dangerous and low-paying jobs many black men had to accept.
Well I'll be blowed. As soon as the draw was made it was obvious that trouble was a certainty.
PHEBE: And to keep my mouth shut when the wind blowed -
Triggered by McMurphy, the gradual revival of Bromden's own humanity and self-esteem is consistently described in terms of physical growth: "I looked down and saw how my foot was bigger than I'd ever remembered it, like McMurphy's just saying it had blowed it twice its size" (210).
All through de day de ole horn wuz blowed, to git up in de mo'nings, to go to de big kitchen out in Mars' back yard ter eat, to go to de fields, an' to come in an' on lak dat all day".(41)
It blowed hard against the northern shore about an eighth of a mile distant on our left, and there was just as much sea as our shallow canoe would bear, without our taking unusual care.