blow out

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blow out

1. To extinguish something (typically a flame) with some form of air, such as breath or wind. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "blow" and "out." Make a wish and blow out your birthday candles! That huge gust of wind blew out all our tiki torches.
2. To break or burst suddenly. I almost lost control of the car when one of the tires blew out on the highway.
3. verb, slang To kill someone, typically with gunfire. Ray blew out the informant, just as the boss told him to.
4. To defeat an opponent easily and/or by a wide margin. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "blow" and "out." The final score was 17–1? Wow, we really blew that team out! I have a feeling the top-ranked team is just going to blow out any opponent they face.
5. To return to a state of calm after turmoil by something's own workings. Don't worry, the storm will blow out eventually.
6. To break or explode due to excessive pressure or force. The vibration of that opera singer's high note blew out a window!
See also: blow, out
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2022 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

blow someone out

Sl. to kill someone, especially with gunshots. (Fixed order.) Lefty set out to blow Max out once and for all. Lefty wanted to blow Max out too.
See also: blow, out

blow something out

to extinguish a flame with a puff of breath. I blew the candle out. I blew out the candles one by one.
See also: blow, out
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

blow out

1. Extinguish, especially a flame. For example, The wind blew out the candles very quickly. [1300s]
2. Lose force or cease entirely, as in The storm will soon blow itself out and move out to sea. Also see blow over.
3. Burst or rupture suddenly, as in This tire is about to blow out. This usage alludes to the escape of air under pressure. [Early 1900s]
4. Also, blow out of the water. Defeat decisively, as in With a great new product and excellent publicity, we could blow the competition out of the water . This term originally was used in mid-19th-century naval warfare, where it meant to blast or shoot another vessel to pieces. It later was transferred to athletic and other kinds of defeat. [Slang; mid-1900s]
See also: blow, out
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

blow out

v.
1. To extinguish something with the breath or a gust of air: The child blew out the candles on the birthday cake. The lamp was flickering, so I blew it out.
2. To be extinguished by the breath or a gust of air: If the wind picks up, our fire will blow out.
3. To remove or burst something with powerful or violent force: The blast blew out all the windows on the block. The sudden pressure blew the pipes out.
4. To cause something to burst: The glass on the road blew out our tires. A nail got caught under the inner tube and blew it out.
5. To burst: The front tire blew out when we were driving down the road.
6. To cause something to stop functioning suddenly. Used of an electrical apparatus: Playing your stereo too loudly will blow your speakers out. The surge in current blew out the microchips in my computer.
7. To stop functioning suddenly. Used of an electrical apparatus: Because the light bulb was old, it blew out.
8. To erupt in an uncontrolled manner. Used of a gas or oil well: If the safety valve breaks, the well might blow out and spill oil everywhere.
9. To diminish; subside. Used reflexively of windy weather conditions: Until the storm blows itself out, we'll have to stay inside.
See also: blow, out
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

blow someone out

tv. to kill someone, especially with gunshots. Lefty set out to blow Harry the Horse out once and for all.
See also: blow, out, someone

blown (out)

mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. Fred stood at the door and told us he was blown—something that was totally obvious anyway.
See also: blown, out
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The accident happened 1,000m below ground and up to 5,000m out beneath the North Sea The blow-out of a mixture of methane and nitrogen did not explode but the high pressure release "displaced a significant amount of mineral", Simon Hunter, a safety manager at ICL UK, told a news conference.
Under-inflation compounds this, causing friction and added heat which can prove too much for weak spots, causing punctures and blow-outs.
Improper sizes of regrind particles, improper blending of the regrind with virgin, and contaminants in the regrind (paper, cardboard, wood, metal) can change the parison die swell or sag and cause blow-outs, thin-outs, or hot spots.
Each tag is designed to send a warning signal when a tire's pressure drops below its specified safety level, which could cause tire failure, tire separation or blow-outs, as well as shorten tire life and reduce fuel economy.
It seems that when Firestone's management first became aware of the tire tread separation, blow-outs and claims, they were more concerned with their financials than with safety, quality or potential ethical problems.
Fox vowed to maintain fiscal prudence ever since the budget blow-outs on "Titanic" (on which it and Paramount recouped handsomely) and the "Speed" sequel (which lost a fortune).
New pressure rules had been introduced here for safety reason after drivers raged over two high-speed blow-outs at the last round in Belgium.
This was experienced by the current championship frontrunners Andy Jordan and Jason Plato who both had high speed blow-outs there last season.
Having said all that, it's hard to imagine we're not going to get some blow-outs in the next few weeks, possibly starting today, as some of the minnows go head-to-head with the big boys.
Punters prepared to forgive him for those two blow-outs should take great heart from the former hunter chaser's second-placed finish at Cheltenham in November.
According to the paper, Botha said South Africa's unconquered run over nine Test series since losing to Australia in February 2009 proved a mental resilience that contrasted starkly with the blow-outs in the limited-overs World Cups.
According to Abu Dhabi Police statistics for this year, blow-outs have been the cause of 54 crashes in the emirate - resulting in six deaths as well as six severe injuries, 24 moderate injuries and 17 minor injuries.
An energy boom in Australia has led to labour shortages and cost blow-outs -- the go-ahead means Australia will have a total of eight LNG projects under way.
According to the writer "in 2007 there were 46 deaths directly attributed to blow-outs..."