blow (one's) own horn

(redirected from blow our own horn)

blow (one's) own horn

To boast or brag about one's own abilities, skills, success, achievements, etc. I don't mean to blow my own horn, but this pasta sauce I made is quite delicious! I can't stand being around Marcus ever since his company became such a massive success. The guy just can't stop blowing his own horn!
See also: blow, horn, own

blow one's own horn

 and toot one's own horn
Fig. to brag. Gary sure likes to toot his own horn. "I hate to blow my own horn," said Bill, "but I am always right."
See also: blow, horn, own

blow one's own horn

Also, blow one's trumpet. Brag about oneself, as in Within two minutes of meeting someone new, Bill was blowing his own horn. [Late 1500s]
See also: blow, horn, own

blow your own horn

AMERICAN
If you blow your own horn, you tell people good things about yourself. I don't go around blowing my own horn, it's true. Note: The usual British expression is blow your own trumpet. Note: In the past, the arrival of important people in a place was announced by the playing of trumpets.
See also: blow, horn, own

blow (or toot) your own horn

talk boastfully about yourself or your achievements. North American
See also: blow, horn, own

blow one’s own horn

and toot one’s own horn
tv. to brag. Gary sure likes to toot his own horn. Say something nice. I’m not one to blow my own horn.
See also: blow, horn, own
References in periodicals archive ?
But why do we blow our own horn? Others should say that.
While it is easy to blow our own horn and take credit for "saving" the Carriage House (literally one week before it was scheduled to be bulldozed), the fact is that following our articles, a number of community leaders worked vigorously behind the scenes over the past two years on behalf of saving the storied structure that serves as a portal to our local heritage.
We don't blow our own horn. So let me "blow our own horn" and tell you about the good things that are happening to NEHA, and why you should become a proud member of NEHA to help ensure that more good things happen to NEHA, and, consequently, to the environmental health profession.
"We don't want to blow our own horn; there were so many people involved," he says.
Shelter books are a part of that, but if you ask me, none of us blow our own horn enough."
Jill Carroll claims that when it comes to scholarship we should "blow our own horns about [our] work".