blow off steam, to

blow off steam

Also, let off steam. Air or relieve one's pent-up feelings by loud talk or vigorous activity. For example, Joan's shouting did not mean she was angry at you; she was just blowing off steam, or After spending the day on very exacting work, Tom blew off steam by going for a long run . This metaphoric term refers to easing the pressure in a steam engine. [Early 1800s]
See also: blow, off, steam

blow off steam

verb
See also: blow, off, steam

blow off steam

To give vent to pent-up emotion.
See also: blow, off, steam

blow off steam, to

To let out one’s frustration or anger, usually by shouting. The term comes from the early days of railroading, when locomotives had no safety valves. When the steam pressure built up, the engineer would pull a lever that would blow off steam and prevent an explosion. It was transferred to human wrath in the early nineteenth century. “The widow . . . sat . . . fuming and blowing off her steam,” wrote Frederick Marryat (The Dog-Fiend, 1837). See also let off steam.
See also: blow, off