blow in


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blow in(to)

1. Of the wind, to blow a person or thing inward or into something else. When "into" is used, it is followed by a noun. The wind is so strong that it keeps blowing in our curtains and knocking things off the windowsills. We had such a hard time walking in that gusty wind that we were almost blown into each other!
2. To arrive in a certain place or area after having been carried by the wind. But if cold air from the north blows in this weekend, that rain will change to snow. The dust storm is going to blow into the city soon. We'd better get indoors.
3. Of a person, to arrive suddenly. Well, Paulina just blew into town, if you want to come over and see her. My brother always just blows in with no warning and expects me to entertain him.
4. To expel air into something. Figuring out how to blow into my saxophone for the first time is something I'll never forget. Blow into that bottle and see what kind of noise it makes.
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blow in

 
1. Go to blow in (from some place).
2. Go to blow in(to some place) (from some place).
3. [for something] to cave in to the pressure of moving air. The door blew in during the storm. The window blew in from the wind.
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blow in

(from some place) [for a wind] to move air in from some place. A huge mass of frigid air blew in from Canada. When the cold air blew in, we were dressed in short sleeves.
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blow in(to some place) (from some place)

Sl. [for someone] to arrive at a place suddenly, or surprisingly, or with a casual air. We blew into town about midnight from Detroit. It was late when we blew in from Detroit. What time did you blow in?
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blow in

Arrive, especially unexpectedly. For example, Just when we'd given him up, Arthur blew in. [Colloquial; late 1800s]
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blow in

v.
1. To push or carry something inward by the force of moving air: Close the door; the wind is blowing in a lot of leaves. The breeze picked up a small feather and blew it in through the window.
2. To be pushed or carried inward by the force of moving air: I opened the screen and several flies blew in.
3. To cause something to collapse inwardly due to sudden powerful or violent force: The force of the explosion blew in the walls of the cave. The huge gust of wind came suddenly, blowing the windows in.
4. To collapse inwardly from sudden powerful or violent force: The holes that had been drilled in the oil field blew in during the fire.
5. To arrive unexpectedly: My old friend blew in from out of town today and paid me a visit.
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blow in

in. to arrive. I just blew in last night. Where can I find a room?
See also: blow