blooper


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blooper

(ˈblupɚ)
1. n. an embarrassing broadcasting error that must be bleeped or blooped out of the program. There is a record you can buy that lets you hear the famous bloopers of the past.
2. n. an error. That was a real blooper. Did you get fired?
References in periodicals archive ?
07 ( ANI ): The Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) on Thursday took a potshot at Congress vice-president Rahul Gandhi for his math blooper and dubbed him immature 'shehzada' (prince).
Musk did not specify when the blooper reel would be released.
An embarrassed PIB promptly deleted the picture, but offered no explanation for the blooper.
It turns out that Schafer had quite a long radio-TV career as program host, with popular spin-off comedy shows like Pardon My Blooper, Prize Bloopers, Blooper Parade, Blooper Blackouts, Blooper Blow-ups and Super Bloopers.
This is the stuff we need to encourage; it's a cross between sports bloopers and the Old Spice guy commercials.
IRON Man 2 has been voted the worst movie for bloopers in the past year.
We will pay on your behalf money in excess of the Retention that you legally have to pay as claim expenses and damages because of a covered claim caused by a blooper in your content services, regardless of when the claim is first made.
Another infamous blooper was the bell-bottomed Arnold Scaasi pantsuit worn by Barbra Streisand to the 1969 ceremony.
The author once again has called upon his "legions of super-dooper blooper snoopers" to scour the earth for the most ill-treated English usages that can be found.
He follows each set of "how not to do it" examples with a section on "Avoiding the blooper," in which he explains what to do and shows examples of Web sites that do it right.
A CONTENDER for Blooper of the Week came from one of our reporters - currently heading in the direction of an atlas.
Your ears play an important role when a blooper goes off, and it pays to listen to the music of your shotgun.
Fast-forward 50 years: At least five primetime series (including a new edition of "Candid") revolve around hidden cameras, and almost every network has a blooper franchise in its arsenal of specials (CBS' "Funny Flubs and Screw Ups," ABC's "Bloopers," NBC's "Funniest Outtakes").
The judges also complimented the copy editor's reply (in the January 2002 issue, page 7) to readers' comments about the blooper.