bloody

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abso-bloody-lutely

Yes, definitely. A more emphatic way to say "absolutely." Will I be at your birthday party? Abso-bloody-lutely!

bloodied but unbowed

Still willing to continue despite stress or setbacks. The troops emerged from the brutal battle bloodied but unbowed. We were bloodied but unbowed after the board rejected our first proposal—we just resolved to make a better pitch next time.
See also: bloody, but, unbowed

bloody but unbowed

Still willing to continue despite stress or setbacks. The troops emerged from the brutal battle bloody but unbowed. We were bloody but unbowed after the board rejected our first proposal—we just resolved to make a better pitch next time.
See also: bloody, but, unbowed

bloody hell

interjection Used to express shock or surprise coupled with an intense emotional reaction, whether positive or negative. Primarily heard in UK. Bloody hell, Jenny, don't sneak up on me like that! You scared the life out of me! A: "The boss wants us to work on Saturday." B: "Bloody hell, again? I'm getting pretty sick of this!" Wow, bloody hell, that's a delicious hamburger!
See also: bloody, hell

bloody minded

slang Petulant and argumentative in nature. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I hate spending time with bloody minded people who have a pessimistic response to all of my ideas. Don't listen to him—he's just bloody minded, and his argument doesn't even make sense.
See also: bloody, minded

bloody nose attack

A pre-emptive military strike intended to accomplish some objective while being limited enough in scope to (ideally) prevent retaliation by target. Sir, I worry that a bloody nose attack will just cause them to attack us more fiercely in return.
See also: attack, bloody, nose

bloody nose strike

A pre-emptive military strike intended to accomplish some objective while being limited enough in scope to (ideally) prevent retaliation by target. Sir, I worry that a bloody nose strike will just cause them to attack us more fiercely in return.
See also: bloody, nose, strike

bloody oath

interjection, slang Primarily heard in Australia, New Zealand.
1. Absolutely; definitely. Used to add emphasis to an affirmative statement or response. A: "Are you going to bring the issue up with him?" B: "Bloody oath I am!" Bloody oath I'm going to the concert! I wouldn't miss it for anything!
2. Used to express an intense emotional reaction, especially excitement or enthusiasm. Bloody oath, Jenny, these cakes are delicious! The newest film in the franchise comes out tomorrow, and, bloody oath, I can't wait!
See also: bloody, oath

bloody up

1. To cause someone or something to bleed profusely. A noun or pronoun can be used between "bloody" and "up." I had to punch through the glass to open the door, and I bloodied up my hand in the process. You really bloodied that guy up during the fight.
2. To get a lot of blood on something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "bloody" and "up." You're a doctor! Don't worry about bloodying up your clothes—just help the poor man! The dog obviously injured its foot, because he bloodied the carpet up when he came into the house.
See also: bloody, up

bloody well

Used before a verb to emphasize that the speaker is upset, angry, or irritated. Primarily heard in UK. You bloody well knew that I have trouble trusting people, and yet you deliberately deceived me! If that's your attitude, then you can bloody well look for another job.
See also: bloody, well

brute force and (bloody) ignorance

An approach or action that prioritizes strong physical force exercised without thought or consideration. You can't just fix everything with brute force and ignorance. Sometimes you need to use some finesse. The government's reaction to this can't just be brute force and bloody ignorance.
See also: and, brute, force, ignorance

cry bloody murder

To scream or complain as though one is experiencing something very dangerous, serious, or frightening (which is not usually the case). Joey cried bloody murder after his scoop of ice cream fell off the cone. You need to stop crying bloody murder over every little injury—a paper cut is not a big deal! If I don't get a refund by tomorrow, I am going to cry bloody murder.
See also: bloody, cry, murder

get a bloody nose

1. Literally, to begin to experience blood flowing from one's nose. I always seem to get a bloody nose in dry climates like this. I didn't get a bloody nose because someone hit me, Mom—I fell at the playground.
2. To receive an injury to one's emotions or pride. A: "He got a bloody nose in the election all right." B: "Yeah, to lose when everyone expects you to win—that's rough."
See also: bloody, get, nose

give (one) a bloody nose

1. Literally, to cause someone's nose to bleed, especially by striking them. Johnny was expelled after he gave one of the boys in class a bloody nose. The dry air in Colorado always gives me a bloody nose when I come to visit.
2. To inflict damage or defeat on someone during a conflict or competition. Everyone agreed that the political newcomer gave the congressman a bloody nose during their first televised debate.
See also: bloody, give, nose

my bloody oath

interjection, slang Primarily heard in Australia, New Zealand.
1. Absolutely; definitely. Used to add emphasis to an affirmative statement or response. A: "Are you going to bring the issue up with him?" B: "My bloody oath I am!" My bloody oath I'm going to the concert! I wouldn't miss it for anything!
2. Used to express an intense emotional reaction, especially excitement or enthusiasm. My bloody oath, Jenny, these cakes are delicious! The newest film in the franchise comes out tomorrow, and, my bloody oath, I can't wait!
See also: bloody, oath

not bloody likely

Definitely not. Used to emphatically indicate that one completely refuses or disagrees. A: "Are you going to Jen's party this weekend?" B: "Not bloody likely! She's been a total jerk to me lately." Help him, after all the trouble he's given me? Ha, not bloody likely!
See also: bloody, likely, not

scream bloody murder

1. To scream or shout very loudly. Enid screamed bloody murder when she noticed the snake in the rocks next to her. Please stop screaming bloody murder across the house. If you want to talk, go to the same room.
2. To forcefully complain, especially loudly and/or in a public manner. When they refused to give me a refund, I screamed bloody murder until the manager came out. Our customers will scream bloody murder if we raise the prices again.
See also: bloody, murder, scream

scream blue murder

1. To scream or shout very loudly. Enid screamed blue murder when she noticed the snake in the rocks next to her. Please stop screaming blue murder across the house. If you want to talk, go to the same room.
2. To forcefully complain, especially loudly and/or in a public manner. When they refused to give me a refund, I screamed blue murder until the manager came out. Our customers will scream blue murder if we raise the prices again.
See also: blue, murder, scream

wave the bloody shirt

To encourage violence and animosity. The phrase was especially popular during the US Civil War. Primarily heard in US. A lot of people in our country are waving the bloody shirt right now, but I just can't support acts of violence, however justified they may be.
See also: bloody, shirt, wave

with bloody hand

Clearly guilty (as if one has been found with evidence of a crime or misdeed). The squire was found with bloody hand, sir— how do you want to punish him?
See also: bloody, hand

yell bloody murder

1. To scream or shout very loudly. Enid yelled bloody murder when she noticed the snake in the rocks next to her. Please stop yelling bloody murder across the house. If you want to talk, go to the same room.
2. To complain forcefully or loudly, especially as to attract public attention. When they refused to give me a refund, I yelled bloody murder until the manager came out. Our customers will yell bloody murder if we raise the prices again.
See also: bloody, murder, yell
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

bloody but unbowed

Fig. showing signs of a struggle, but not defeated. (Originally referring to the head. From the poem Invictus by William Earnest Henley.) Liz emerged from the struggle, her head bloody but unbowed. We are bloody but unbowed and will fight to the last.
See also: bloody, but, unbowed

cry bloody murder

Fig. to scream as if something very serious has happened, especially unnecessarily. Now that Bill is really hurt, he's crying bloody murder. There is no point in crying bloody murder about the bill if you knew the restaurant was expensive.
See also: bloody, cry, murder

scream bloody murder

 and yell bloody murder
Fig. to complain bitterly; to complain unduly. When we put him in an office without a window, he screamed bloody murder. There is something wrong next door. Everyone is yelling bloody murder.
See also: bloody, murder, scream
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

scream bloody murder

Angrily protest as loudly as possible, as in When Jimmy took her teddy bear, Lauren screamed bloody murder, or Residents are screaming bloody murder about the increase in property taxes. The scream here may be either literal (as in the first example) or figurative, which is also true of invoking murder as though one were in danger of being killed. Versions of this term, such as cry murder, date from the 1400s.
See also: bloody, murder, scream
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

scream blue murder

BRITISH, INFORMAL or

scream bloody murder

AMERICAN, INFORMAL
1. If someone screams blue murder, they complain a lot about something. Unions accept free accommodation and travel, yet they would scream blue murder if the same was received by politicians. `If the FBI was doing this, people would be screaming bloody murder,' says Richard Taylor, a security and privacy expert.
2. If someone screams blue murder, they scream and shout very loudly. She screamed blue murder as he came at her. She ran from the building, screaming bloody murder. Note: The expression `blue murder' is perhaps derived from the French oath `morbleu', which is a variation of `mort Dieu'. `Bleu' or blue is used in French as a euphemism for `Dieu' or God, so `morbleu' literally means `blue death'.
See also: blue, murder, scream

give someone a bloody nose

BRITISH, JOURNALISM
If you give someone a bloody nose in an election, competition or war, you defeat them or harm them. Elections provide an opportunity for voters to give the government a bloody nose. They promised to give the military a bloody nose if it continues its policy of repression. Note: You can also say that a person or a side gets a bloody nose. The Chancellor got a bloody nose in the recent regional election. Note: A bloody nose is used in several other structures with the same meaning. The government last night admitted that it had received a bloody nose from voters after suffering a crushing defeat in the byelection. We sent the enemy home with a bloody nose.
See also: bloody, give, nose, someone

bloodied but unbowed

LITERARY
If a person or organization is bloodied but unbowed, they have had a bad experience, but they have not been defeated or destroyed and are determined to continue with something. He is bloodied but unbowed after his very narrow election victory. The group was bloodied but unbowed, selling off its non-tobacco businesses to keep big shareholders happy. Note: Adjectives such as battered, bloody and defeated can be used instead of bloodied. The construction giant has emerged from the recession battered but unbowed. Note: Unbowed means standing upright without showing fear or pain.
See also: bloody, but, unbowed
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

bloody (or bloodied) but unbowed

proud of what you have achieved despite having suffered great difficulties or losses.
See also: bloody, but, unbowed

scream (or yell) blue murder

make an extravagant and noisy protest. informal
A North American variant of this phrase is scream bloody murder .
1995 Iain Banks Whit I was now left with the ticklish problem of how to let my great-aunt know there was somebody there in the room with her without…causing her to scream blue murder.
See also: blue, murder, scream

give someone a bloody nose

inflict a resounding defeat on someone.
See also: bloody, give, nose, someone
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

scream blue ˈmurder

(British English) (American English scream bloody ˈmurder) (informal) shout, scream, etc. very loudly and for a long time; make a lot of noise or fuss because you disagree very strongly with something: Jill will scream blue murder if Ann gets promoted and she doesn’t.
See also: blue, murder, scream
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

abso-bloody-lutely

(ˈæbsoblədiˈlutli)
mod. absolutely; emphatically. We are abso-bloody-lutely sick to death of your wishy-washy attitude.

scream bloody murder

tv. to scream very loudly; to complain or protest loudly. She screams bloody murder every time I get near her.
See also: bloody, murder, scream
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

bloody but unbowed

Wounded or scarred, but not defeated. The term, expressing fierce defiance, comes from the Victorian poet William Ernest Henley’s most famous work, “Invictus:” “Under the bludgeonings of chance my head is bloody, but unbowed.”
See also: bloody, but, unbowed

scream bloody/blue murder, to

To shout loudly in pain, fear, or anger. The second term appears to have originated as a play on the French expletive morbleu (mort bleu translates as “blue murder”). The Hotten Dictionary of Slang (1859) defined it as a desperate or alarming cry. The term was used by Dion Boucicault about 1874: “They were standing by and trying to screech blue murder” (quoted in M. R. Booth, English Plays of the Nineteenth Century; cited by OED). It is heard less often, at least in America, than the more graphic bloody murder, dating from the first half of the 1900s. For example, “The one-year-old who has yelled bloody murder during his physical . . .” (B. Spock, Problems of Parents, 1962).
See also: bloody, blue, scream
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
The eight deaths on Thursday and Friday represented the bloodiest 24-hour period on the ground for British forces in Afghanistan.
After more than two years of fighting side-by-side and leading one of the bloodiest conflicts in the recent history of Middle-East, FSA and al-Qaeda affiliated groups have been making increasing moves against each other to come in control of the armed insurgency.
Police said they had stepped up security in Karachi after the shootings, the bloodiest sectarian attack in the city this year.
Northern Afghanistan's largest city, home to 200,000, saw some of the bloodiest fighting of the war between the Taliban and Northern Alliance.
The programme looks behind the historical figure to reveal a troubled man who was a dominant force in England in the mid-17th century as it underwent a huge change in the bloodiest of civil wars.
THE bodies of two Scottish soldiers killed in one of the bloodiest battles of WWI have been discovered.
Summary: The four British soldiers who died on one of the bloodiest days for UK forces in Afghanistan have been named.
As he prepares to unleash the world's most powerful army in his war against terrorism, the president has been mugging up on America's bloodiest conflict, the Civil War.
Juliana Ruhfus embarks on a remarkable journey to the tantalum mines in an effort to discover whether the current mobile phone boom is fuelling the world's bloodiest conflict.
The bomb marked the bloodiest day in the latest Middle East crisis and went off hours after Israeli troops killed four Palestinians.
It was the bloodiest single episode of violence against civilians reported in months.
As he prepares to unleash the world's most powerful army in his war against terrorism, the president has been reading up on America's bloodiest conflict, the Civil War.
The deaths came a day after Prime Minister Mr Atal Bihari Vajpayee cautioned against more political violence following a weekend that brought the bloodiest day so far in India's month-long parliamentary elections.
The Battle of Pinkie Cleugh in Musselburgh, East Lothian, was one of the bloodiest defeats in Scotland's violent history.
Elsewhere in Idlib in Northwestern Syria, the armed rebels of the Free Syrian Army (FSA) arrested a number of ISIL militants, including Osama Memar known as Abu Wael Al-Amir, ISIL commander in Ma'ar Tamsarin, and transferred them to an unknown location.Ee After more than two years of fighting side-by-side and leading one of the bloodiest conflicts in the recent history of Middle-East, FSA and al-Qaeda affiliated groups have been making increasing moves against each other to come in control of the armed insurgency.