blindside

(redirected from blindsides)
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blind side

1. verb To startle or surprise someone, as with a piece of information. Tommy totally blind sided me when he told me he was going to prom with my ex-girlfriend.
2. verb To physically strike someone who is not in a position to defend themselves. Come on, ref, isn't that a penalty? He totally blind sided me and hit me in the head!
3. noun The side that one is not currently facing. Come on, ref, isn't that a penalty? He totally hit me on my blind side!
4. noun An area that is not able to be seen, either due to its location outside of the field of vision, or due to some physical obstruction or a defect in one's vision. That car must have been on my blind side because I didn't see it coming at all!
See also: blind, side

blind spot

1. An area that is not able to be seen, either due to its location outside of the field of vision, or due to some physical obstruction or a defect in one's vision. Often used to describe the areas around a car that cannot be seen with the rear-view or side mirrors. This car has a big blind spot on the right side, so remember to always turn your head to look before merging. Leslie always experiences blind spots when she starts to get a migraine. That security camera has a blind spot—and that's where we'll sneak in.
2. By extension, an aspect of one's life or a certain situation that one is ignorant of or that one does not understand fully. Jen has a real blind spot when it comes to her relationships with men trying to take advantage of her wealth.
See also: blind, spot

blind side

see under blind spot.
See also: blind, side

blind spot

Subject about which one is ignorant or biased. For example, The boss has a blind spot about Henry; he wouldn't fire him for anything, or Dad has a blind spot about opera; he can't see anything good about it. This term uses blind in the sense of "covered or hidden from sight." It has two literal meanings: an insensitive part of the retina and an area outside one's field of vision. The phrase has largely replaced blind side, which survives mainly in the verb to blindside, meaning "to hit someone on an unguarded side" and "to deal an unexpected blow." [Mid-1800s]
See also: blind, spot

blindside

tv. [for someone or something] to surprise someone, as if sneaking up on the blind side of a one-eyed person (or animal). The new tax law blindsided about half the population.