blast off


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blast off

1. To shoot upward from the ground, as of a rocket. The rocket blasted off successfully and is now headed for the moon. My kids love blasting off toy rockets in the back yard and seeing how high they'll go.
2. To ignite an exploding device, such as fireworks. Our poor dog is hiding under the bed because our neighbors celebrate the Fourth of July by blasting off tons of fireworks.
3. To use an explosion to destroy or remove something. After the emergency crew blasted off some rocks, they were able to free the trapped hikers from the cave.
4. To amputate by means of an explosion. I'm really worried my fool husband is going to blast off a hand while playing with those fireworks!
5. To depart very quickly. The robbers blasted off when they heard the approaching sirens.
6. To strike with a lot of force in order to remove something, as with a pressure washer or sandblaster. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "blast" and "off." The sidewalk looks so clean this morning! I guess someone from the township blasted all the stains off of it. We can blast off that graffiti with the pressure washer.
See also: blast, off

blast (something) off (something else)

to remove something from something else with a powerful charge, pressure, or force. They blasted the writing off the wall with a stream of sand. We will have to blast the paint off the wall.
See also: blast, off

blast off

 (for some place)
1. [for a space vehicle] to take off and head toward a destination. The rocket blasted off for the moon. Will it blast off on time?
2. Sl. [for someone] to leave for a destination quickly. Ann blasted off for the library so she could study. I've got to blast off. It's late.
See also: blast, off

blast off

1. Also, blast away. Take off or be launched, especially into space, as in They're scheduled to blast off on Tuesday. This usage originated with the development of powerful rockets, spacecraft, and astronauts, to all of which it was applied. [c. 1950]
2. Depart, clear out, as in This party's over; let's blast off now. [Slang; early 1950s]
3. Become excited or high, especially from using drugs, as in They give parties where people blast off. [Slang; c. 1960]
See also: blast, off

blast off

v.
1. To be launched off the ground. Used of rockets: The astronauts were strapped in their seats and ready to blast off.
2. To launch some rocket from the ground: The space agency needs a new location to blast off its spacecraft. The kids set up their model rockets on the field and blasted them off.
3. To explode or fire something: I blasted off some firecrackers during the celebration. I put some bullets in the gun and blasted a few rounds off to test it.
4. To dislodge or remove something with an explosion: Be careful not to blast your fingers off with that loaded gun! To make room for the new road, the workers blasted off a large rock from the side of the hill.
5. Slang To depart for a destination: We need to blast off right now if we are going to get to the party on time.
See also: blast, off

blast off

verb
See also: blast, off
References in periodicals archive ?
To celebrate the arrival of Blast Off in Coventry, Toys R Us are offering readers the chance to win some great prizes.
Blast Off began at the city's Civic Halls in 1996 and is the world's second biggest club night - second only to Manumission in Ibiza - having welcomed nearly one million customers through its doors.
Discovery was scheduled to blast off at 0235GMT this morning and streak by a nearly full moon, taking seven astronauts, including a British robotics expert, on a mission to rewire the International Space Station.
The blast off chair vibrates as if you are being launched into space."
The public will be able to watch the craft blast off and land on its inaugural sub-orbital flight.
Elk Grove Township established the Back to School Blast Off! program in the summer of 2016, to ensure in-need CCSD59 families could provide their children with needed school supplies at the start of the school year.
What is the name of the space shuttle that will blast off on its final flight next week, carrying a crew of six and supplies to the International Space Station?
The Skylark rocket had been due to blast off at 6am but poor weather conditions forced experts to put the launch back four hours However, strong ground winds continued to hamper launch attempts throughout the morning and was postponed until early today.
The Rosetta craft had been due to blast off from the European Space Agency's launch centre on the edge of the jungle in Kourou, French Guyana on Thursday morning but bad weather halted the countdown.
The hi-tech Mission: SPACE will let thrillseekers experience what it is really like to blast off towards the stars.
While some went for blast off, others went for broke on the rail contraption.
But the fossil hunt won't begin until 2013, when a NASA robot probe should blast off and return with rock samples two or three years later.
space officials are confident the shuttle Columbia will blast off as planned tomorrow, ushering a new era in space travel.
Science minister Lord Sainsbury switched on a giant digital clock at the Royal Society in London at precisely 2.45pm - two weeks and four hours before Mars Express is due to blast off from Kazakhstan on June 2.
An hour later the first fireworks blast off to a soundtrack of Robbie Williams, Madonna, Tom Jones and Stereophonics.