blame shifting

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blame shifting

The act of exchanging accusations and blame, as between two or more parties, during a dispute or some undesirable event. After the team lost the match, there was a bit of blame shifting going on between the players and the coaches. The government parties prefer to partake in blame shifting during an economic crisis.
See also: blame, shift

blame shifting

n. a process in business and government wherein the blame for something bad is shifted from person to person. (A coinage that has appeal because it fills the need to express the concept succinctly.) Can’t we have a decent argument without your constant blame shifting?
See also: blame, shift
References in periodicals archive ?
It is rarely the act itself which causes the downfall, but the attempts at a cover-up and blameshifting.
The Brexit elite - including a Nigel Farage, off earning his fortune abroad - holding their flags and doubting the patriotism of Remainers is crude blameshifting. People won't fall for it again.
Discourse in Washington, especially at its partisan and blameshifting worst, has long found ways to attribute conflict and disorder in the Middle East to this or that U.S.
The book is divided into three in-depth case studies--the first two focusing on deception through blameshifting involving Franklin Roosevelt (World War II, a "high-opposition, high-deception" case) and Lyndon Johnson (the Vietnam War, a "medium opposition, medium-deception" case).
RADICAL plans to give Liverpool its own directly elected police chief are a recipe for "blameshifting and buck passing", a leading city councillor has warned.
The Chancellor's fourth big set-piece within a year will be shameless blameshifting when he will claim that trouble abroad is slowing his recovery and therefore requiring deeper cuts.
(193) By adopting the most constitutionally vulnerable option and then authorizing judicial review, this committee seemed to be engaging in a classic game of "blameshifting." That is, they were formulating what appeared to be a strict law, but counting on courts to order that it not be enforced as written.
The blameshifting strategy was in evidence throughout the legislative debate.
Thus, to a certain extent, FECA's authors provide us with a textbook example of "blameshifting" in constitutional politics--creating a case by which the Supreme Court would overturn the legislation that Congress had just passed, with legislators then blaming the Court (and, by extension, the Constitution) for whatever policy failures occur in the aftermath.
The "blameshifting" model leaves too many questions unanswered.
The blameshifting rationale does not tell the whole story of FECA's judicialization because, in fact, many of the Act's authors actually wanted relatively strict new limits on campaign finance.