blamed


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Related to blamed: blame shifting

blame for (something)

To foist or assign responsibility or guilt for something on someone else (who can be mentioned between "blame" and "for"). My partner had been cooking the books for years, but because I was the CEO, I was blamed for our company's collapse. Don't blame me for your unhappiness—I told you not to take that job!
See also: blame

blame on (someone)

To foist or assign responsibility or guilt for something on someone else. A noun can be used between "blame" and "on." My partner had been cooking the books for years, but because I was the CEO, our company's collapse was blamed on me. Don't blame your unhappiness on me—I told you not to take that job!
See also: blame, on
References in periodicals archive ?
'The President, Prime Minister, the former president and the politicians are blamed for the economic crisis but no one speaks of the wrong doings which Central Bank officials are involved in' he said.
Twenty-three percent of Americans overall blamed Trump while just eight percent blamed Ryan.
However, the fact that Americans have consistently blamed Obama's predecessor more than they blame him for the country's economic problems may explain why his overall job approval rating has consistently exceeded his economic approval rating as well as Americans' general satisfaction with the country.
Stress was largely blamed for the soaring increase in sick leave by both officers and civilian staff.
How is this civilised or fair - and then to add insult to tragedy the labourers themselves are blamed. I could not believe my eyes.
Yes, we put in additional precautions but how can you predict the current torrential down fall of rain - so much in such a short time, "It is not the council that should be blamed. It's an easy option to blame the local authority.
Does Cameron remember who the minister blamed for the queues?
THE Queen's jubilee was yesterday blamed by the Bank of England for the recession.
Nevertheless, public servants thinking about the degree to which they are personally responsible for the results of their actions or inactions (and therefore open to being blamed) should read The Blame Game because it would help them come to grips with the "blame avoidance" context within which they must work out this vexing question.
* SIR - Your article in Country & Farming ("Flying predators being blamed for fall in numbers of other birds", September 27), with a nice photo of a red Kite and the caption "birds such as red Kites are pushing some birds to extinction", is wrong in that it blames red Kites for the demise of woodland birds.
I was once in love with a man who blamed. He blamed someone for everything in his life that wasn't perfectly to his liking.
The mam-of-four said the boys were blamed for things they hadn't done because they had a reputation.
If global warming predicts "a catastrophy of cold and hot, drought and flood", then can the great Australian droughts of the 19th century be blamed on global warming?
The ethnic Albanian leaders should also be blamed because they kept quiet and were not more determined in their demands and for this reason they now seek the blame in others.
On his view, blame is not simply an evaluative attitude or an emotion; rather, when one blames another, one judges her blameworthy and, crucially, takes one's relationship with her to be impaired; one's attitudes towards the blamed person change.