black out

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black out

1. verb To lose consciousness. My blood sugar dropped so low during the meeting that I blacked out and woke up on the floor.
2. verb To experience a period of time about which one does not remember anything, despite having been fully conscious at the time (as during a stressful or traumatic event.) It's like I blacked out during the interview—I don't remember anything I said!
3. verb To avoid thinking about or remembering something, often because it is stressful or traumatic. Many trauma victims try to black out the horrific things that have happened to them.
4. verb To prevent something from being broadcast or disseminated, usually in a specific geographic area. Ugh, the game must be blacked out tonight. Is it on any other channel? The dictator has blacked out news from the rest of the world.
5. verb To cover something (usually with black lines or blocks) so that it cannot be seen or read. Be sure to black out all the other names on this list before you put it in the employee's file. The newspaper blacked out part of the photograph.
6. noun An episode of unconsciousness. Often written as one word ("blackout"). My blood sugar dropped so low that I had a blackout during the meeting and woke up on the floor.
7. noun A period of literal darkness caused by the loss of electricity, as during a storm. Often written as one word ("blackout"). We read by candlelight to pass the time during the blackout.
8. adjective slang Extremely drunk, often to the eventual point of unconsciousness. Often written as one word ("blackout"). He was blackout last night, so I'm not surprised that he doesn't remember talking to you.
See also: black, out

black something out

 
1. Lit. to cut or turn out the lights or electric power. The lightning strike blacked the entire town out. The manager blacked out the whole building during the emergency to prevent an explosion.
2. Fig. to prevent the broadcast of a specific television or radio program in a specific area. Will they black the game out around here? They blacked out the basketball game in this area.
See also: black, out

black out

 
1. Lit. [for lights] to go out. Suddenly the lights blacked out. The power went dead and everything blacked out from the heat.
2. Fig. to pass out; to become unconscious. After I fell, I must have blacked out. I think I am going to black out.
See also: black, out

black out

1. Obliterate with black, as in crossing out words on a page or print on a screen. For example, They have blacked out all the obscene words in the subtitles to make this movie suitable for youngsters . This usage may be derived from an earlier meaning, "to stain or defame," which dates from the 15th century (and probably alludes to "blackening" a person's reputation). [Mid-1800s]
2. Extinguish all lights. For example, The whole town was asleep, as blacked out as London during the war. In the early 1900s this expression alluded to the lights in a theater, but from about 1940 on it meant darkening an entire city to hide it from enemy bombers.
3. Lose consciousness, faint; also, experience a temporary loss of memory. For example, I couldn't remember a single note of the music; I blacked out completely, or The accused man claims he blacked out after his first drink. This usage is thought to have originated with pilots, who sometimes fainted briefly when pulling out of a power dive. It soon was transferred to other losses of consciousness or memory. [c. 1940]
See also: black, out

black out

v.
1. To stop emitting light; go out: The traffic lights blacked out when the storm knocked down power lines.
2. To cause a failure of electrical power in some region: The strong winds blacked out much of the city.
3. To lose consciousness or memory temporarily: The patient felt very dizzy and blacked out for a few minutes.
4. To suppress some memory from the conscious mind: The refugees blacked out their wartime experiences.
5. To prohibit the broadcast or spread of something, especially by censorship: The government blacked out the news that was broadcast from enemy radio stations.
See also: black, out
References in periodicals archive ?
Several majjor blackouts have occurred over the past 20 years, as well as many smaller power failures--and most experts expect more of both in the future.
Science, technology, and society: How a massive blackout struck areas of the Eastern U.
In September, daily power blackouts extended from three hours to eight hours.
Indeed, as FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler pointed out shortly after the vote in September: "[E]veryone needs to be aware of who allows blackouts to exist, and it is not the Federal Communications Commission.
The telecom regulator had directed the telecom firms in September 2008 to limit the amount of blackout days to five for each calendar year and ordered them not to make any inductions or alterations in the blackout days list once a particular tariff scheme is selected by the consumer.
Asked if there were a chance that the league as a whole would look into the blackout policy, the league said that they continue to look at it as it is the number one customer service complaint.
More than half of all the students had had one or more memory blackouts in the 12 months leading up to the start of the study; 7 percent reported six or more during this time.
A breakdown in a complex grid of electric lines and switches led to a series of events that caused the blackout.
Richardson's Republican successor as energy secretary, Spencer Abraham, agreed that the blackout reflected inadequate centralized regulation of the energy industry.
The August 14th blackout indicates that the general public is far away from attaining this level of electrical availability.
When the region's electric power grid is close to overload or in a power blackout, all of ConnectiCare's key departments will continue to operate by switching to generator power.
Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) today issued a direction prescribing additional measures with a view to enhance transparency in the matter of charging on blackout days.
Kyrgyzstan will stop practicing rotating blackout since November 3 replacing them with targeted blackouts.
While the chances are slim that another blackout like the one last August will occur anytime soon, why take a chance?
The app will give consumers real-time status of outages in any part of the country and allow them to lodge complaint on blackout in their area.