black

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black

mod. without cream or milk. (Said of coffee.) Black coffee, good and hot, please.
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References in periodicals archive ?
After the Subject, I move on to the World, Descartes's res extensa, there where Blackness as a Category, trailing the destiny of all other tools of scientific reason, comprehends human existence in a frozen slice of interpretation of Space and Time.
During the past decade I and many other musicologists, cultural theorists, performers, composers, and public intellectuals have engaged in discussions (oral and written) as to how blackness is defined by and interpreted through popular culture in the forms of music, literature, the visual arts, film, and theater.
Historically aligned with hypervisibility, blackness places the individual on display.
As achieving whiteness is socially rewarding and blackness inhibits socio-economic ascension, the preferred Latin American prototype still distances itself from blackness.
Episodes of Blackness, which uses dance theatre, music and spoken word, is performed by Vocab Dance Company.
After developing a theoretical model for the German reception of blackface, I discuss the function of blackness and blackface within comic theory, in particular the writings of Theodor Lipps and Emile Kraepelin.
Of all these stylistic devices, Walcott depends mainly on the use of metaphor to illustrate the key concept in his play: the reclaiming of blackness in order to forge an independent West Indian identity.
Fryer and Levitt also provide an important empirical investigation as to whether the blackness of a respondent's name (i.
Cecil Foster, Blackness and Modernity: The Colour of Humanity and the Quest for Freedom.
Though at rimes Lhamon seems to be conflating blackface with real blackness, he admits that blackface was racist by nature and not a portrayal of authentic blackness.
I am taking as my starting point a question one of my colleagues, Irina Reyfman, posed when my co-editors and I were first beginning the project that culminated in the book Under the Sky of My Africa: Alexander Pushkin and Blackness.
Drawing on 19th and 20th-century medical illustrations, pickup notices, fugitive-slave narratives, true-crime books, documentary films, and poetry, the author analyzes the connections between blackness and trans identity in the context of ongoing black and trans deaths.
I continue to think about the implications of that comment and the need for blackness to be presented in protest.
Rivera-Rideau's Remixing Reggaeton presents an insightful reading of reggaeton as a discursive cultural practice inextricably linked to the experience of blackness in the African diaspora.
She said on ITV's Lorraine: "This depression hit me and I don't use the word depression lightly, this was a blackness where I would wake up.