black gum


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black gum

A deciduous tree (Nyssa sylvatica) native to eastern North America, known for the shades of bright scarlet its leaves turn in the autumn; also known as sour gum, black tupelo, or simply tupelo. The leaves of the black gum are an amazing sight in autumn.
See also: black, gum
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
These differences were significant ([alpha] = 0.05) for all but the black gum samples treated with creosote; all of the creosote polymer treatments; and the soft maple, hard maple, and ponderosa pine samples treated with copper naphthenate.
"There's a tremendous diversity of natural foods--acorns, beech and hickory nuts, cherries, black gum, raspberries and huckleberries.
Students in Richard Howarth's AP environmental science class and Anna Dahlberg's Life Skills class spent the early part of the morning digging holes; after a speaking segment featuring local dignitaries and two students, the planting of Bald Cypress and Black Gum trees began on three parking lot islands.
In many other trees such as black gum, sassafras, dogwood, and some maples and oaks, the pigment anthocyanin adds red to the palette.
Belonging to yet another group are black gum and tupelo, which are members of the dogwood family.
Tupelo (commonly called black gum) -- one of the first trees to change color -- turn the area into a blaze of red.
I asked Woodfield to name some of the more popular trees for use in an urban setting, and he listed red maple, swamp white oak, black gum, sweetbay magnolia and American beech.
You may wish to consider the installation of a flowering tree such as a Kousa dogwood, or an Eastern Redbud, Cornel Cherry, Japanese Stewartia, Magnolia, Flowering Crabapple, Black Gum Tree, Sourwood or a Mountain Ash.
One is a quarter-mile long, the other a mile and a half walk that includes a visit to the Black Gum Swamp on a board walkway.
Signs and symptoms of scurvy (also known as vitamin C deficiency) include easy bruising and breaking of skin; blisters that would develop into ulcers; bleeding black gums; and brittle bones due to the breakdown of collagen, which is dependent on vitamin C for its production.
To reproduce, it needs to forage among abundantly flowering blue gums or black gums, close to old-growth trees with multiple hollows for nesting.