black gum


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black gum

A deciduous tree (Nyssa sylvatica) native to eastern North America, known for the shades of bright scarlet its leaves turn in the autumn; also known as sour gum, black tupelo, or simply tupelo. The leaves of the black gum are an amazing sight in autumn.
See also: black, gum
References in periodicals archive ?
There's a tremendous diversity of natural foods--acorns, beech and hickory nuts, cherries, black gum, raspberries and huckleberries.
CSX and Alliance for Community Trees will plant 65 large spruce and loblolly pine, black gum, southern red oak, Kentucky coffee, redbud, American elm and crape myrtle trees along Boulevard Drive, which runs by the Fulton Cotton Mill and the CSX Container facility.
In addition, there is within the sale area an estimated volume of 267 CCF of Black Gum, Scarlet Oak, Black Locust, and Post Oak Sawtimber that the bidder agrees to remove at a fixed rate.
Students in Richard Howarth's AP environmental science class and Anna Dahlberg's Life Skills class spent the early part of the morning digging holes; after a speaking segment featuring local dignitaries and two students, the planting of Bald Cypress and Black Gum trees began on three parking lot islands.
Belonging to yet another group are black gum and tupelo, which are members of the dogwood family.
You may wish to consider the installation of a flowering tree such as a Kousa dogwood, or an Eastern Redbud, Cornel Cherry, Japanese Stewartia, Magnolia, Flowering Crabapple, Black Gum Tree, Sourwood or a Mountain Ash.
One is a quarter-mile long, the other a mile and a half walk that includes a visit to the Black Gum Swamp on a board walkway.
To reproduce, it needs to forage among abundantly flowering blue gums or black gums, close to old-growth trees with multiple hollows for nesting.
Sumacs and black gums flare red; ashes and hickories swing from amber to gold; the leaflet tips of black walnuts begin to coast downward like minute sunlit canoes.
Salmon anglers must hark back to 1997 for decent opening-day takes of kings, with their distinctive black gums.
And Southern California has had a recent history of remarkable takes of the silver-sided denizens with the distinctive black gums that are also known as chinooks.