bite

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bite

1. verb To respond to an invitation or ad, often a dishonest or misleading one. I tried to trick my brother into cleaning my room, but he didn't bite.
2. verb To be bad or seem ominous. I'm surprised he was nice to you—he usually bites.
3. verb To steal or take something. Aw man, somebody bit my notes, so I couldn't study at lunch.
4. verb, slang To be annoying or disappointing. Oh, that TV show bites. This season has been so stupid that I just can't watch it.
5. noun A meal, often one that is small or doesn't take long to prepare or eat. A shortened form of the phrase "a bite to eat." We don't have a lot of time, so let's just grab a quick bite before the movie starts. Let's pull off at the next rest stop to grab a bite.

*bite (to eat)

to get something to eat; to get food that can be eaten quickly. (*Typically: get ~; grab ~; have~.) I need a few minutes to grab a bite to eat. Bob often tries to get a bite between meetings.

bit

1. n. a jail sentence. (Underworld.) Mooshoo did a two-year bit in Sing Sing.
2. n. a small theatrical part. (From bit part.) It was just a bit, but I needed the money.
3. n. any part of an act; any isolated activity or presentation. I didn’t like that bit concerning penalties.

bite

1. in. to accept a deception; to fall for something; to respond to a come-on. We put up a sign advertising free pop, but nobody bit.
2. in. [for someone or something] to be bad or threatening. My dad bites, but don’t worry, he’s in a good mood.
3. in. to be irritating. (More severe than to suck, as in It sucks.) This party bites. Sko.
4. tv. to copy something without permission; to steal something. Sue bit a copy of my term paper, and I almost got in trouble.

bite

/hold (one's) tongue
To be or keep silent.
See:
References in periodicals archive ?
29) In patients with more severe bites, eschar may take months to develop and the skin may take several months more to heal.
29) Why bites do not promptly heal is not clear, but the persistence of venom in the wound or the generation of secondary inflammatory mediators may play a role.
In one series of bites, the incidence of skin necrosis was 37% and the incidence of systemic illness was 14%.
The increase in dog bites coincided with an increase in dog ownership in the mid-1990s as crime rates spiked and people purchased large dogs for protection, officials said.
Dog bites have become essentially an epidemic in this country.
Most dog bites are the owners' fault, and they're making the dog owners who get obedience training for their dogs suffer.