bite the dust

(redirected from bit the dust)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

bite the dust

1. slang Of a person, to die. We were so lucky to avoid that massive accident—we might have bitten the dust!
2. slang Of a machine, to be near a complete breakdown or loss of functionality. Judging by all that noise coming from her car, I'm pretty sure it's about to bite the dust. I have to go buy a new blender because mine bit the dust today.
3. slang To become unpopular or irrelevant. Sadly, it doesn't take long for the latest technological innovations to bite the dust.
See also: bite, dust

bite the dust

 
1. Sl. to die. A shot rang out, and another cowboy bit the dust. The soldier was too young to bite the dust.
2. Sl. to break; to fail; to give out. My old car finally bit the dust. This pen is out of ink and has bitten the dust.
See also: bite, dust

bite the dust

Suffer defeat or death, as in The 1990 election saw both of our senators bite the dust. Although this expression was popularized by American Western films of the 1930s, in which either cowboys or Indians were thrown from their horses to the dusty ground, it originated much earlier. Tobias Smollett had it in Gil Blas (1750): "We made two of them bite the dust."
See also: bite, dust

bite the dust

COMMON
1. If something bites the dust, it fails or stops existing. With the news that milk chocolate can help cut cholesterol, yet another healthy eating fad bites the dust. Quite a few restaurants have bitten the dust recently.
2. If someone bites the dust, they die. A Wild West showman nearly bit the dust when he blew himself up making blank bullets in his garden shed. Note: This expression is used to refer to someone's death in a humorous way. Note: In stories about the Wild West, cowboys were said to `bite the dust' when they were shot and fell off their horses.
See also: bite, dust

bite the dust

1 be killed. 2 fail. informal
See also: bite, dust

bite the ˈdust

(informal)
1 fail, or be defeated or destroyed: Thousands of small businesses bite the dust every year.
2 (humorous) die
See also: bite, dust

bite the dust

1. tv. to die. A shot rang out, and another cowboy bit the dust.
2. tv. to break; to fail; to give out. My car finally bit the dust.
See also: bite, dust

bite the dust

Slang
1. To fall dead, especially in combat.
2. To be defeated.
3. To come to an end.
See also: bite, dust

bite the dust, to

To be defeated or killed. The term became popular from American western films, in which cowboys and/or Indians frequently “bit the dust”—that is, were shot or shoved off their horses to the dusty ground. It became current in the late 1930s. However, the term occurs even earlier in William Cullen Bryant’s translation (1870) of Homer’s Iliad (“his fellow warriors . . . fall round him to the earth and bite the dust”) and it also is found in translations of Virgil’s Aeneid.
See also: bite
References in periodicals archive ?
The Sardis side were originally due to be involved in the Wales-South Africa Challenge Cup over the coming weeks, but that tournament bit the dust.
Remember long ago when Derek bit the dust? And recently we had the shameful demise of Dennis and Duggie.
Barca are odds-on at 4-5 to become the first team to retain the Champions League after the English challenge bit the dust, but they have been handed the toughest semi, with Inter 11-5 to go through at Barca's expense.
The idea that farright nasty Nick Griffin could milk a Royal garden party for publicity bit the dust faster than you could say "fascist".
Hmm - when the old Feethams stadium bit the dust back in 2003, Luke was only four.
ABERDEEN'S dream of Scottish Cup glory bit the dust at Easter Road last night when they were gunned down 4-1 by Hibs.
That's because several gearboxes on these cranes have bit the dust. A cracked gearbox means your crane isn't going anywhere until help arrives.
The England captain put himself in the firing line against the Aussie pace attack on day two of the tour match but he bit the dust with only 16 to his name.
After all of the big names like Tiger Woods, David Duval and Ernie Els bit the dust - Britain's five representatives did not even survive the opening round - the 35-year-old Maggert, seeded 24th, beat compatriot Andrew Magee by chipping in from 20 feet at the second extra hole after two rounds of cut-and-thrust could not separate them.
David Moyes's boys are now as short as 5-6 and no better than evens after Totesport's standout 11-10 bit the dust yesterday.
ANOTHER Cheltenham Festival favourite bit the dust last night when Ollie Magern was ruled out with a leg injury.
Christian O'Connell bit the dust and now C4's hugely expensive Boys And Girls has gone the same way.