bite (one's) tongue

(redirected from bit my tongue)

bite (one's) tongue

1. Literally, to accidentally pinch one's tongue with one's teeth. My daughter started crying after she bit her tongue.
2. To stop oneself from saying something (often something potentially inappropriate, hurtful, or offensive). I had to bite my tongue as my sister gushed about her new boyfriend yet again.
See also: bite, tongue
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

bite one's tongue

 
1. Lit. to bite down on one's tongue by accident. Ouch! I bit my tongue!
2. Fig. to struggle not to say something that you really want to say. I had to bite my tongue to keep from telling her what I really thought. I sat through that whole silly conversation biting my tongue.
See also: bite, tongue
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bite one's tongue

Refrain from speaking out, as in A new grandmother must learn to bite her tongue so as not to give unwanted advice, or I'm sure it'll rain during graduation.-Bite your tongue! This term alludes to holding the tongue between the teeth in an effort not to say something one might regret. Shakespeare used it in 2 Henry VI (1:1): "So York must sit and fret and bite his tongue." Today it is sometimes used as a humorous imperative, as in the second example, with the implication that speaking might bring bad luck. [Late 1500s] Also see hold one's tongue.
See also: bite, tongue
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bite your tongue

COMMON If you bite your tongue, you do not say something that you would like to say. All I can do is to bite my tongue if I want to keep my job.
See also: bite, tongue
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

bite your tongue

make a desperate effort to avoid saying something.
See also: bite, tongue
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

bite your ˈtongue

stop yourself from saying something that might upset somebody or cause an argument, although you want to speak: I didn’t believe her explanation but I bit my tongue. OPPOSITE: give somebody a piece of your mind
See also: bite, tongue
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

bite your tongue

Hope that what you just said doesn’t come true. This imperative is a translation of the Yiddish saying, Bays dir di tsung, and is used in informal conversation. For example, “You think it’ll rain on their outdoor ceremony? Bite your tongue!” A much older but related phrase is to bite one’s tongue, meaning to remain silent when provoked—literally, to hold it between one’s teeth so as to suppress speaking. Shakespeare had it in Henry VI, Part 2 (1.1): “So Yorke must sit, and fret, and bite his tongue.” See also hold one's tongue.
See also: bite, tongue
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
I pushed him away but he put his hand on my throat and then bit my tongue, cutting a piece of it," she added.
She said I think i bit my tongue. A couple days go by and there's a bigger spot of blood.
The tracks are "I Am", "putalittlemoreloveintheworld", "Breathe", "Book of Love", "I Am Here", "Queen of the Forest", "Grand Design", "Happening For You", "Bit My Tongue", and "Center of You, Center of Me".
On this instance I decided to take the "flight" option, swallowed my pride and bit my tongue.
I've bit my tongue on this for ages, but can stand it no more.
Mayall said: "Thankfully, I bit my tongue. That's the worst thing, if you have a seizure and you swallow your tongue, you're a goner."