bite (one's) tongue

(redirected from bit his tongue)

bite (one's) tongue

1. Literally, to accidentally pinch one's tongue with one's teeth. My daughter started crying after she bit her tongue.
2. To stop oneself from saying something (often something potentially inappropriate, hurtful, or offensive). I had to bite my tongue as my sister gushed about her new boyfriend yet again.
See also: bite, tongue

bite one's tongue

 
1. Lit. to bite down on one's tongue by accident. Ouch! I bit my tongue!
2. Fig. to struggle not to say something that you really want to say. I had to bite my tongue to keep from telling her what I really thought. I sat through that whole silly conversation biting my tongue.
See also: bite, tongue

bite one's tongue

Refrain from speaking out, as in A new grandmother must learn to bite her tongue so as not to give unwanted advice, or I'm sure it'll rain during graduation.-Bite your tongue! This term alludes to holding the tongue between the teeth in an effort not to say something one might regret. Shakespeare used it in 2 Henry VI (1:1): "So York must sit and fret and bite his tongue." Today it is sometimes used as a humorous imperative, as in the second example, with the implication that speaking might bring bad luck. [Late 1500s] Also see hold one's tongue.
See also: bite, tongue

bite your tongue

COMMON If you bite your tongue, you do not say something that you would like to say. All I can do is to bite my tongue if I want to keep my job.
See also: bite, tongue

bite your tongue

make a desperate effort to avoid saying something.
See also: bite, tongue

bite your ˈtongue

stop yourself from saying something that might upset somebody or cause an argument, although you want to speak: I didn’t believe her explanation but I bit my tongue. OPPOSITE: give somebody a piece of your mind
See also: bite, tongue

bite your tongue

Hope that what you just said doesn’t come true. This imperative is a translation of the Yiddish saying, Bays dir di tsung, and is used in informal conversation. For example, “You think it’ll rain on their outdoor ceremony? Bite your tongue!” A much older but related phrase is to bite one’s tongue, meaning to remain silent when provoked—literally, to hold it between one’s teeth so as to suppress speaking. Shakespeare had it in Henry VI, Part 2 (1.1): “So Yorke must sit, and fret, and bite his tongue.” See also hold one's tongue.
See also: bite, tongue
References in classic literature ?
In pronouncing these he was one day so eager, that he unfortunately bit his tongue; and in such a manner, that it not only put an end to his discourse, but created much emotion in him, and caused him to mutter an oath or two: but what was worst of all, this accident gave Thwackum, who was present, and who held all such doctrine to be heathenish and atheistical, an opportunity to clap a judgment on his back.
But, after losing an FA Cup third-round tie for the first time, Wenger bit his tongue.
LABOUR'S lost leader David Miliband bit his tongue for nearly five years and opinion will be split about his devastating criticism of brother Ed.
He denies the charges, claiming she consented to sex and that he only beat her because she bit his tongue, a Dubai Court of First Instance heard.
She told officers who arrived at Mr Coghill's flat: "We've had a domestic and I bit his tongue off.
He says when he was in his teens a girl almost bit his tongue off and he's had a horror of kissing on the mouth ever since.
Last month, John, who has battled booze and drug problems, was rushed to hospital after he suffered a convulsion and bit his tongue.
When the teacher came to the house and announced she was taking little James on an educational trip, the senior Baldwin bit his tongue and got out of the way.
Upson bit his tongue while Fabio Capello parachuted Ledley King and Jamie Carragher into the starting side ahead of him, even though the West Ham defender was a squad regular throughout the qualifying campaign.
Nicholson then tried to kiss the terrified woman while strangling her, but she bit his tongue until it bled.
So he bit his tongue and gave the answer he'd memorized from the INS' study materials: "Being a U.S.
No two matches are alike but our players have all the ingredients for success." Trapattoni bit his tongue when asked if the comments were disrespectful to his team but said: "I am a diplomatic coach and I know these situations, I have seen them before.
The only damage was that he bit his tongue which was painful, but he is over that now," said the trainer.