birth tourism


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birth tourism

Travel to another country for the specific purpose of giving birth to one's child there, so as to avail of that country's economic advantages, such as superior healthcare, or to gain citizenship for the child and/or parent(s). Due to its universal healthcare, even for foreign nationals, the country is a popular destination for birth tourism.
See also: birth
References in periodicals archive ?
King's observation of the time, stripped of any racial or ethnic overtones, is even more valid today in a world burdened by a human population ten times the capacity of the Earth to support and when many economically advanced countries are in danger of being overrun by uncontrolled waves of economic migrants and climate refugees, and at a time when "birth tourism" and "chain immigration" have become the common practice.
Trump calls birthright citizenship a"crazy, lunatic policy" that encourages illegal immigration and has"created an entire industry of birth tourism." We're well aware that more than 4 million children born in the US reside with at least one undocumented parent, and nearly 700,000 of those are in Texas alone, according to the nonpartisan Migration Policy Institute.
He railed against "birth tourism," where mothers from abroad travel to America to have babies so they will automatically be U.S.
Constitution and blamed it for the rise in "birth tourism" in the country.
The latest was Canada's Conservative Party resolution to axe 'birthright citizenship', or as some might refer to it as "birth tourism."
Wang's "Intra-Asian infrastructure of Chinese Birth Tourism: Agencies' Operations in China and Taiwan" and Linda Yin-Nor Tija and Wing-Chung Ho's "Beipiao and Gangpiao: Young Chinese Migrants' Drifting Experiences in Beijing and Hong Kong." Wang explores the growing trend of Chinese birth tourism (1) to the United States through an analysis of the agencies that facilitate client immigration.
In particular, local interpretations of birth tourism as "immigration loopholes" in southern California highlight the nexus of reproduction, citizenship regimes, and racial formations--a nexus that brings historical xenophobia against especially the Chinese to the forefront (Lee, 2002).
Asian birth tourism is actually a blessing for America.
Reflecting Conservative concerns about "birth tourism" and bogus marriages, the backlog in processing in citizenship applications has exploded, from 27,000 in 2007 to 204,000 in 2012.
About two years ago, Hong Kong authorities were forced to act on what the islanders called, 'birth tourism': the arrival of pregnant mothers from the mainland for the delivery of the babies so that the latter get the citizenship.
And this was not the first time Karen had indulged in what has been dubbed "birth tourism." Her first son is a year and three months old and he too "is American," she told The Daily Star.
"Lifting of travel visas requirements for Taiwanese will undoubtedly ease the challenges to birth tourism and add to US immigration problem," writes Tyler Grant, a 2012-2013 Fulbright Fellow in Taiwan.
Just as Trump rails against undocumented immigrants having"anchor babies" in the United States that allow them to settle in the country through their citizen children, conservative politicians in Canada have condemned"birth tourism." The opposition Conservative Party vowed last summer to pursue legislation to eliminate birthright citizenship unless one of the parents of the child born in Canada is a citizen or permanent resident.
It is useful to revisit the political, economic, and social conditions that gave rise to China's new rich, especially when we try to understand the relationships between a rising Chinese wealthy class and luxury consumption, the global real estate market, Chinese investment in Africa, and even the growth of maternity and birth tourism in North America.
And on the question of giving automatic citizenship to children born in America to non-US citizen parents,"birth tourism" -- which draws hundreds of wealthy Russian and Chinese families a year -- is at least eyebrow-raising.