bird of passage

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bird of passage

A person who remains unfixed to a certain location, relocating from one place to another. The economy has forced me to become a bird of passage, moving around the state to wherever I can find work.
See also: bird, of, passage

bird of passage

A transient, one who is here today and gone tomorrow. For example, Mary moves nearly every year; she's a true bird of passage. This phrase transfers the literal meaning of a migrating bird to human behavior. [Second half of 1700s]
See also: bird, of, passage

a bird of passage

If you call someone a bird of passage, you mean that they never stay in one place for long. Most of these emigrants were birds of passage who returned to Spain after a relatively short stay.
See also: bird, of, passage

a bird of passage

someone who is always moving on.
Literally, a bird of passage is a migrant bird.
See also: bird, of, passage

a ˌbird of ˈpassage

a person who does not stay in a place for very long
See also: bird, of, passage
References in periodicals archive ?
Two years after the publication of Italian Birds of Passage, the 2016 collection of essays, Neapolitan Postcards: The Canzone Napoletana as Transnational Subject, edited by Goffredo Plastino, expanded upon Frasca's scholarship, thereby broadening the field.
Italian Birds of Passage belongs to a larger debate on the relationship between music and Italian emigration, one inaugurated by historians such Anna Maria Martellone ["La rappresentazione dell'identita italoamericana: teatro e feste nelle Little Italy statunitensi" in Sergio Bertelli (ed,), La chioma della vittoria.
"We have not spotted any birds of passage this year so far in Hokarsar," Lone said.
Sarebbe, anzi, auspicabile che la stessa Frasca progettasse ulteriori studi che andassero a coprire con l'acume e la competenza rivelati in Birds of Passage pure il periodo della seconda guerra mondiale e del dopoguerra.
This discursive double-cross is one indication of how Blind's representations of Egypt, Italy, and England in Birds of Passage participate in ideologies of imperialism despite her political radicalism and her usual emphasis in her poetry on liberatory or progressive narratives.
policymakers work to regulate today's "birds of passage," they would do well to read Reinventing Free Labor.
In Flyttfaglar (Birds of Passage) the two main characters are charming and believable women, but overly neatly matched: Inge, the divorced Swedish mum with two grown daughters, befriends Mira, the divorced Chilean mum with two grown sons.
The anatomist John Hunter (1728-93) tested the theory in various experiments, concluding that it was nonsense.(29) On the other hand, Cuvier (1769-1832), no less an anatomist than Hunter, declared that |the martin becomes torpid during winter; and that it passes the cold season under water at the bottom of marshes appears to be certain'.(30) On 3 April 1794, Mrs Thrale noted that |The swallows came very early this year; I saw a large flight yesterday pass my window here, while the maid was dressing my head; and I made her notice how tired they seemed -- as if fatigued with a long journey -- I do think they are birds of passage, yet whither do they go?
The anthology, with thirty-one selections in prose and poetry, presents glimpses of Halifax as "garrison town, naval station, major East Coast port, and centre of commerce, government and education." For a seaport that has seen so many travellers and transients, Bell has wisely chosen to offer not only the impressions of well-known writers native to Nova Scotia, but also the comments of famous birds of passage. Here is the Halifax of Thomas Moore, Charles Dickens and, of course, Rudyard Kipling, whose 1896 "Song of the Cities" originated the phrase "Warden of the North." Indeed, Bell cleverly includes one writer who never came to Halifax at all: Israel Zangwill, who conjured up an entirely imaginary Halifax for his 1895 novel The Master.
" Birds of passage who had migrated to the island from Nobreadland and Alltoomany, they pass their time in sumptuous living, warbling to the ringing of bells.
Birds of Passage (15) on Wednesday and Thursday is from the makers of Embrace the Serpent and is a remarkable vivid portrayal of the life and traditions of the Wayuu community in Colombia set against the rise and fall of a family entrenched in the drug trade with America in the 1970s.
of Sydney) gives a solid evaluation of what the author of such works as Birds of Passage and Pomeroy can do.
Dr Richard Mullen is the author of Victoria: Portrait of a Queen; Anthony Trollope: A Victorian in His World and Birds of Passage: Five Englishwomen in Search of America.
Although inevitably 'birds of passage', it is clearly undeniable that British administrative, educational and other London-appointed officers were invariably dedicated and completely incorruptible.
It was Josiah Quiney, the President of Harvard, who dismissed the English women travellers to his country as but 'birds of passage who skim over the country like vultures over the surface of the Carolinas, pouncing upon whatever is corrupt ...'.