birds of a feather


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birds of a feather

Similar or like-minded people. A shorthand version of the full proverb "birds of a feather flock together," meaning people who have similar interests, ideas, or characteristics tend to seek out and/or associate with one another. I knew you and John would get along well, you're birds of a feather, after all.
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a feather

If you describe two or more people as birds of a feather, you mean that they are very similar in many ways. Nancy and my mother were birds of a feather. You felt something special between them that left you out. We're birds of a feather, you and me, Mr Plimpton. Note: You can also use the full expression birds of a feather flock together to mean that similar people like to be with each other. Birds of a feather flock together. Basically, people seek out neighbourhoods that are most congenial to them.
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a feather

people with similar tastes, interests, etc.
This phrase comes from the proverb birds of a feather flock together , which has been current in this form since the late 16th century. Its origins may ultimately lie in the Apocrypha: ‘the birds will resort unto their like’ (Ecclesiasticus 27:9).
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a ˈfeather (flock toˈgether)

(saying) similar people (spend time together): She spent most of her time abroad with other English speakers, which I suppose is only natural. Birds of a feather flock together, after all.
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a feather

and BOF
phr. & comp. abb. people who share an interest or proclivity. Those guys are really birds of a feather. They are always together. We’re BOF and love to hike and enjoy nature.
See also: bird, feather, of