bind

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double bind

A no-win situation. When both of Sally's jobs scheduled her to work on the same day, she was put in a double bind. She needed both incomes and could not afford to lose either position.
See also: bind, double

bind (something or someone) down

To anchor or fasten something or someone in place. You need to bind down the shed in the back yard before the big storm. Can you please bind down the baby in her highchair?
See also: bind, down

bind over

1. To present a criminal to a legal authority. A noun can be used before or after "over." A: "Who's being interrogated?" B: "Someone the guys on patrol bound over to our department last night."
2. To use a legal obligation to induce a particular action (such as appearing in court or avoiding trouble), as of a criminal. A noun can be used before or after "over." My lawyer believes that the judge will bind me over in exchange for my good behavior.
See also: bind, over

bind (someone or something) together

To join or fasten together. I fell down because some pranksters bound my shoelaces together. The teacher bound us together for the three-legged race.
See also: bind, together

bind up

To wrap something or someone in a material. A noun can be used before or after "up." I bound up my foot in a bandage to try to reduce the swelling. Bind yourself up in blankets if you're cold.
See also: bind, up

bound hand and foot

1. Literally, having one's hands and feet tied together. In the movie, the security guards were all bound hand and foot so that they couldn't sound the alarm.
2. By extension, feeling trapped in a daunting situation. I graduated from college and found myself bound hand and foot to debt that I won't be able to pay off for years.
See also: and, bound, foot, hand

in a bind

In a particularly difficult or awkward situation, especially one that is not easy to resolve or escape. I'm going to in quite a bind if this loan isn't approved. Sorry I'm late, Fred was in a bind and needed me to drive him home.
See also: bind

bind (one) hand and foot

1. Literally, to tie one's hands and feet together. In the movie, the villain bound all the security guards hand and foot so that they couldn't sound the alarm.
2. By extension, to cause one to feel trapped in a daunting situation. Yes, I have a degree now, but this institution has bound me hand and foot to debt that I won't be able to pay off for years.
See also: and, bind, foot, hand

tie (one) hand and foot

1. Literally, to tie someone's hands and feet together. In the movie, the villain tied all the security guards hand and foot so that they couldn't sound the alarm.
2. By extension, to cause someone to feel trapped in a daunting situation. Yes, I have a degree now, but this institution has tied me hand and foot to debt that I won't be able to pay off for years.
See also: and, foot, hand, tie

in a double bind

In a position in which either of two choices will result in negative consequences; in a no-win situation. When both of Sally's jobs scheduled her to work on the same day, she was put in a double bind. She needed both incomes and could not afford to lose either position.
See also: bind, double

bind off

In knitting, to make an edge with a row of stitches. A noun or pronoun can be used between "bind" and "off." Your scarf looks great—you just need to bind off now.
See also: bind, off

bind someone or something down

to tie or secure someone or something to something. Bind the tarpaulin so it won't get away. We will bind down the patient tightly. They bound the hatch down so it could not be opened.
See also: bind, down

bind someone or something together

to tie the parts of something together; to tie a number of things or people together. Can you bind together all three parts? Bind these two bandits together and lead them to jail.
See also: bind, together

bind someone or something up (in something)

 and bind someone or something up (with something)
to tie someone or something up in something. They bound the books up in leather straps. I will bind up the larger sticks in strong cord.
See also: bind, up

bind someone over (to someone or something)

to deliver someone to some legal authority; to deliver someone to some legal authority. (A legal usage.) They bound the suspect over to the sheriff. The sheriff will bind over the suspect to the county jail.
See also: bind, over

bound hand and foot

with hands and feet tied up. The robbers left us bound hand and foot. We remained bound hand and foot until the police found us and untied us.
See also: and, bound, foot, hand

*in a bind

 and *in a jam
Fig. in a tight or difficult situation; stuck on a problem. (*Typically: be ~; get [into] ~; find oneself ~.) I'm in a bind. I owe a lot of money. Whenever I get into a jam, I ask my supervisor for help. When things get busy around here, we get in a bind. We could use another helper.
See also: bind

bind over

Oblige someone to do or not do something; hold on bail or keep under bond. For example, The sheriff will bind over the murder suspect to the homicide division. This phrase is nearly always used in a legal context. [Late 1500s]
See also: bind, over

bound hand and foot

Wholly obligated, unable to free oneself. For example, These rules have us bound hand and foot; we can't even discuss the matter. This term transfers the literal meaning, having one's hands and feet tied and therefore unable to move, to legal, moral, or social obligations. The expression dates from the 10th century a.d.
See also: and, bound, foot, hand

in a bind

Also, in a box or hole or jam or tight corner or tight spot . In a difficult, threatening, or embarrassing position; also, unable to solve a dilemma. For example, He's put us in a bind: we can't refuse, but at the same time we can't fill the order, or Jim's in a box; he can't afford to pay what he owes us, or He quit without giving notice and now we're really in a hole, or We always end up in a jam during the holiday season, or He's in a tight corner with those new customers, or We'll be in a tight spot unless we can find another thousand dollars. All these colloquial terms allude to places from which one can't easily extricate oneself. The phrase using bind was first recorded in 1851; box, 1865; jam, 1914; tight spot, 1852. Also see in a fix.
See also: bind

a double bind

If you describe a situation as a double bind, you mean that the situation is impossible, because you have a problem that you cannot solve without causing another problem. It is the absent dad's double bind: abandon your children and you are attacked as irresponsible; fight to keep contact with them and you are accused of disrupting the child's new family life. Note: You can also say that you are in a double bind or are caught in a double bind. Women are in a double bind: they are expected to act like men, but are criticized when they do.
See also: bind, double

bound hand and foot

If someone or something is bound hand and foot by something, that thing prevents them from acting freely or doing what they want. These people are bound hand and foot by tradition. In a land bound hand and foot by petty regulations and bureaucracy, he saw that there were thousands of deals just waiting to be done.
See also: and, bound, foot, hand

bind (or tie) someone hand and foot

severely restrict someone's freedom to act or make decisions.
See also: and, bind, foot, hand, someone

in a ˈbind

(American English) in a difficult situation that you do not know how to get out of: I’d be in a bind without a car. I drive everywhere these days.
See also: bind

in a ˌdouble ˈbind

in a situation in which it is difficult to choose what to do because whatever you choose will have negative results: Students are caught in a double bind between a lack of jobs if they leave school and a huge bill for higher education if they stay.
See also: bind, double

bind/tie somebody hand and ˈfoot

remove or restrict somebody’s freedom of action or movement: Staying at home to look after a sick parent often means that a person is tied hand and foot.I can do nothing to help you because I’m bound hand and foot by my present contract.
See also: and, bind, foot, hand, somebody, tie

bind off

v.
To secure some number of stitches in knitting and form an edge by lifting one stitch over the next: Bind off 12 stitches on the next row to make the neck edge. Make 5 stitches on the next row and bind them off. The scarf is long enough, so you can bind off.
See also: bind, off

bind over

v.
To put someone under a financial obligation as a guarantee of that person's appearance at trial or of his or her good behavior for a period of time: I was arrested for littering, and the court bound me over to keep the peace for six months. After a brief hearing, the judge bound over the accused murderer for trial and set the bail at one million dollars.
See also: bind, over

bind

n. a problem; a wrinkle. Unfortunately, a new bind has slowed down the project.

in a bind

In a difficult or embarrassing position; also, unable to solve a problem. First recorded in 1851, the term alludes to being bound up and hence unable to function. For example, “With donations failing to come in, the opera company found itself in a bind.” There are numerous synonyms for the expression, the most common of which today are in a hole, in a jam, in a tight corner, in a tight spot, in a fix. See also in a pickle; in a pinch.
See also: bind
References in periodicals archive ?
As in Anslyn's experiments, the test chemicals bind to the receptors, displacing the indicator molecules and causing the dyes to change color.
One limitation of the two bind systems discussed so far is that they require vinyl covers.
The DBA lectin did not inhibit attachment of recombinant VLPs, which indicates that it does not bind oligosaccharide structures recognized by VLPs and HPA.
If you continue to crank counterclockwise and bind the cable, you'll lose tension on the winch.
We may note that Jesus binds laws more frequently than he looses them.
Hydrophobic interactions bind some proteins there, while hydrogen bonding or other forces attach yet other proteins to the hot spot.
Predictably, small molecules that interfere with the ability of NS1 to bind dsRNA or prevent IFN[alpha]/[beta] production will also enhance the host innate immunity against influenza virus, resulting in faster viral clearance.
also binds to the androgen receptor with high affinity and non-competitively with respect to free androgen (Martin et al.
It secretes its own receptor, Tir, into the host and then binds intimately to it by its outer membrane protein, intimin.
As it turns out, Breaker's team had previously synthesized an aptamer that binds to this metabolite.
A team from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have found that a protein named ATR directly binds to DNA.
The patent specifically claims a method for altering the binding characteristics of a DNA-binding protein (e.g., a transcription factor) by adding a small-molecule drug that binds to a target region in the DNA that is adjacent to or overlapping a regulatory protein binding site.
Past research has revealed that M protein binds to the blood protein fibrinogen.
HN, a protein on the surface of the virus, binds to cells, permitting a cascade of molecular events that results in the virus fusing to the target cell and then incorporating itself into the cell.
When the researchers expose the sensor to an aqueous stream containing a protein that binds to lipids, the liquid crystal molecules respond within seconds by switching to a planar orientation.