bind

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double bind

A no-win situation. When both of Sally's jobs scheduled her to work on the same day, she was put in a double bind. She needed both incomes and could not afford to lose either position.
See also: bind, double

bind (something or someone) down

To anchor or fasten something or someone in place. You need to bind down the shed in the backyard before the big storm. Can you please bind down the baby in her highchair?
See also: bind, down

bind over

1. To present a criminal to a legal authority. A noun can be used before or after "over." A: "Who's being interrogated?" B: "Someone the guys on patrol bound over to our department last night."
2. To use a legal obligation to induce a particular action (such as appearing in court or avoiding trouble), as of a criminal. A noun can be used before or after "over." My lawyer believes that the judge will bind me over in exchange for my good behavior.
See also: bind

bind (someone or something) together

To join or fasten together. I fell down because some pranksters bound my shoelaces together. The teacher bound us together for the three-legged race.
See also: bind, together

bind up

To wrap something or someone in a material. A noun can be used before or after "up." I bound up my foot in a bandage to try to reduce the swelling. Bind yourself up in blankets if you're cold.
See also: bind, up

bound hand and foot

1. Literally, having one's hands and feet tied together. In the movie, the security guards were all bound hand and foot so that they couldn't sound the alarm.
2. By extension, feeling trapped in a daunting situation. I graduated from college and found myself bound hand and foot to debt that I won't be able to pay off for years.
See also: and, bound, foot, hand

bind someone or something down

to tie or secure someone or something to something. Bind the tarpaulin so it won't get away. We will bind down the patient tightly. They bound the hatch down so it could not be opened.
See also: bind, down

bind someone or something together

to tie the parts of something together; to tie a number of things or people together. Can you bind together all three parts? Bind these two bandits together and lead them to jail.
See also: bind, together

bind someone or something up (in something)

 and bind someone or something up (with something)
to tie someone or something up in something. They bound the books up in leather straps. I will bind up the larger sticks in strong cord.
See also: bind, up

bind someone over (to someone or something)

to deliver someone to some legal authority; to deliver someone to some legal authority. (A legal usage.) They bound the suspect over to the sheriff. The sheriff will bind over the suspect to the county jail.
See also: bind

bound hand and foot

with hands and feet tied up. The robbers left us bound hand and foot. We remained bound hand and foot until the police found us and untied us.
See also: and, bound, foot, hand

*in a bind

 and *in a jam
Fig. in a tight or difficult situation; stuck on a problem. (*Typically: be ~; get [into] ~; find oneself ~.) I'm in a bind. I owe a lot of money. Whenever I get into a jam, I ask my supervisor for help. When things get busy around here, we get in a bind. We could use another helper.
See also: bind

bind over

Oblige someone to do or not do something; hold on bail or keep under bond. For example, The sheriff will bind over the murder suspect to the homicide division. This phrase is nearly always used in a legal context. [Late 1500s]
See also: bind

bound hand and foot

Wholly obligated, unable to free oneself. For example, These rules have us bound hand and foot; we can't even discuss the matter. This term transfers the literal meaning, having one's hands and feet tied and therefore unable to move, to legal, moral, or social obligations. The expression dates from the 10th century a.d.
See also: and, bound, foot, hand

in a bind

Also, in a box or hole or jam or tight corner or tight spot . In a difficult, threatening, or embarrassing position; also, unable to solve a dilemma. For example, He's put us in a bind: we can't refuse, but at the same time we can't fill the order, or Jim's in a box; he can't afford to pay what he owes us, or He quit without giving notice and now we're really in a hole, or We always end up in a jam during the holiday season, or He's in a tight corner with those new customers, or We'll be in a tight spot unless we can find another thousand dollars. All these colloquial terms allude to places from which one can't easily extricate oneself. The phrase using bind was first recorded in 1851; box, 1865; jam, 1914; tight spot, 1852. Also see in a fix.
See also: bind

a double bind

If you describe a situation as a double bind, you mean that the situation is impossible, because you have a problem that you cannot solve without causing another problem. It is the absent dad's double bind: abandon your children and you are attacked as irresponsible; fight to keep contact with them and you are accused of disrupting the child's new family life. Note: You can also say that you are in a double bind or are caught in a double bind. Women are in a double bind: they are expected to act like men, but are criticized when they do.
See also: bind, double

bound hand and foot

If someone or something is bound hand and foot by something, that thing prevents them from acting freely or doing what they want. These people are bound hand and foot by tradition. In a land bound hand and foot by petty regulations and bureaucracy, he saw that there were thousands of deals just waiting to be done.
See also: and, bound, foot, hand

bind off

v.
To secure some number of stitches in knitting and form an edge by lifting one stitch over the next: Bind off 12 stitches on the next row to make the neck edge. Make 5 stitches on the next row and bind them off. The scarf is long enough, so you can bind off.
See also: bind, off

bind over

v.
To put someone under a financial obligation as a guarantee of that person's appearance at trial or of his or her good behavior for a period of time: I was arrested for littering, and the court bound me over to keep the peace for six months. After a brief hearing, the judge bound over the accused murderer for trial and set the bail at one million dollars.
See also: bind

bind

n. a problem; a wrinkle. Unfortunately, a new bind has slowed down the project.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, "accessory" molecules on T cells also bind to proteins on other immune cells as part of the activation process.
The chemicals bind to receptors on the tissue's millions of neurons, the neurons relay the information to the brain, and voila--you know that the peach is ripe and the lilacs are in bloom.
Same old story: If you continue to crank, loose cable winds off the winch drum, gets tangled and binds.
In 5:31-32, Jesus binds the prohibition against adultery as applicable to divorce and remarriage, and does so with explicit repudiation of scriptural allowance for the latter.
The prodomain binds on subtilisin's two parallel surface [alpha]-helices and supplies caps to the N-termini of the two helices.
When certain cell-surface receptors bind a chemical stimulus, such as an opiate or a hormone, they interact with so-called G proteins.
We demonstrated that, without an intermediary, ATR binds to DNA, and when there is DNA damage [ATR] binds with higher affinity," says Sancar.
a Xerox subsidiary, has developed ChannelBind System 20, a mechanical device that binds documents instantly, without glue or heat, and the final product looks professionally bound.
In partnership with SEG, NESI can now offer customers DB2 solutions that increase data availability, automate database maintenance, perform SQL management tasks and manage binds.
A protein found on red blood cells in sickle-cell disease binds these cells to blood vessel walls, disrupting circulation, a new study suggests.
Once in the nucleus, GR binds as a homodimer in a head-to-head manner to its cis-acting DNA recognition element, the GRE (consensus GRE half-site, TGTTCT).
The technology uses a time-gated spectrometer to measure the luminescence of Dipicolinic acid (DPA), a chemical unique to bacterial spores, when it binds to a chemical sensor.
As it turns out, Breaker's team had previously synthesized an aptamer that binds to this metabolite.
Once bindin binds to the egg surface, it activates the egg's development.