bindle

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bindle

1. A small cloth sack tied to the end of a stick and traditionally carried by hobos. When you live a nomadic life, you don't need any more possessions than can fit in your bindle.
2. A small container or envelope of drugs. Be careful—you don't want the police to catch you with a bindle of that stuff in your purse.

bindle

1. n. a packet or bundle; a hobo’s pack. Throw your bindle over yonder, and plunk your butt on that empty crate.
2. n. a packet of drugs. (Drugs.) She had a bindle of H. in her purse.
References in classic literature ?
"I know your kind--brave as lions when it comes to pullin' miserable, broken-spirited bindle stiffs, but as leery as a yellow dog when you face a man.
"The very first time the idea came around was at a pub on the seafront called Bindles. It was either 1984 or 1985," Rob, 54, said.
As officers searched the house, one noticed Jones moving around and ingesting several small bindles. The substance in the bindles was field-tested as heroin.
The business has gone through a few name changes of late; formerly the Glasshouse and now Bindles, the official name of the place is Danesbury House.
Investigators say they believe two of the packets they called "bindles," each a little less than a quarter of an ounce, ruptured in her stomach.
The defendant's expression went from that of being calm to nervous, and he hesitantly reached into his pocket and removed a clear plastic baggy containing approximately nine white paper bindles, the type routinely used to package rock cocaine, and stated, "its [sic] rocks." [W]e recovered the bag and found it to contain nine paper bindles, each one, containing approximately ten off-white wafers resembling rock cocaine.
Bunge was searched and found to have in his possession 45 bindles of heroin, a half-ounce of marijuana, a digital scale, and a used hypodermic needle, according to the police report.
As Crooks explains: I seen hundreds of men come by on the road and on the ranches, bindles on their back and that same damn thing in their head.
He or she was different most of all because of a message that was explained, preached, and sung around the campfires of bindlestiffs (agricultural workers carrying bedrolls or bindles) and timber wolves (lumber workers); at the mess hall or commissary of hard rock miners and seamen; on the streets of mill villages but also in the social halls of Finnish-American, Hungarian, or Russian immigrants; across the borders in Canada and Mexico by men and women who moved from one job to another; and, for a while, even in the parlors of Greenwich Village.
Bindles has over 19 years' experience in the research and development of telecommunications products at Alcatel, a supplier of telecommunication infrastructures.
It was always done so stealthily that you might have thought they were slipping me bindles of cocaine.
While the younger generations may instantly think of the tattooed Nessa manning the slot machines in TV sitcom Gavin & Stacey, older people may recall taking a spin across the dancefloor at former ballroom Bindles.
"When we talk about planting or putting a case on someone, for some reason, some investigators or some attorneys have thought that we actually--I go into the car, take the three bindles [of drugs], lay it next to him and go, 'See, that's what you dropped.'
During that difficult year, Jim's mutual friend Pat invited him out on a blind date with Jenny as she and her friends all needed a lift to the fondlyremembered dance hall Bindles in Barry.