bigger bang for the buck

bigger bang for the buck

More for one’s money. The term was invented in 1954 by U.S. defense secretary Charles E. Wilson, who was advocating better use of defense appropriations, relying principally on nuclear deterrents; “bang” refers to a nuclear explosion. Later it was extended to numerous civilian contexts calling for better value. It echoes an older advertising slogan for a soft drink, “More bounce to the ounce.”
See also: bang, big, buck
References in periodicals archive ?
What's less certain is when the Fed will act and how big any cut will be -- a more traditional 25 basis point move or a bolder, 50 basis point reduction designed to get a bigger bang for the buck.
Alan Auerbach and Yuri Gorodnichenko have found that that the effect of bonus depreciation is countercyclical, so that we get a bigger bang for the buck when the economy is going poorly than when it is growing.
The state is looking for a bigger bang for the buck and so is the federal government, which often provides the funds that support state grant programs, especially community development funds, which come from the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development.
These wines also must be paired with the right food if you wish to get a bigger bang for the buck. Most wine drinkers, though, are like the French or Italian peasants of the past.
"For example, programs that target people high in neuroticism may get bigger bang for the buck than more widespread outreach efforts," he said.
"Those families will spend those dollars quickly, and there will be a bigger bang for the buck," she said.
Consumers spend on products that give bigger bang for the buck, so a powerful marketing tool would be to give them more value for their money, Sultan added.
Like other F/A-22 supporters, Bath challenged the contention that the Air Force would get a bigger bang for the buck by buying more F-15s and F- 16s.
We could spend what we spend more efficiently, always in search of bigger bang for the buck."
Still, those who follow the massive $250 billion-a-year underground economy, like Harvard economist Mihir Desai, maintain there would be much bigger bang for the buck if these same resources were devoted to pursuing offshore accounts and other scam tax shelters.
There's a bigger bang for the buck. And voters (read: consumers) retain negative messages longer.
Realtors feel newspapers cost too much, Williams said, adding that they want added value -- a bigger bang for the buck.
Eisenberg, who resigned as president and chief operating officer of Peoples in January, six months after the chain was purchased by CVS, says one of the things his new firm is emphasizing is how strategic partnerships between retailers and suppliers can reduce backroom costs and give stores "a bigger bang for the buck."
"If it is meant to encourage percentage shopping and giving more bounce per ounce, a bigger bang for the buck, that's a concern."
We get a bigger bang for the buck than on almost anything else.'