big time

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big time

1. adverb A lot; in a significant manner. You owe me big time for driving you to the airport at 4 AM! We're going to need to catch up big time if we want a chance to win.
2. noun A status or situation involving a lot of fame or success. Though she'd been acting for years, it was after her role in last summer's blockbuster that she finally hit the big time.
3. adjective Prominent or significant. The phrase is usually hyphenated when used as an adjective. Though she'd been acting for years, it was her role in last summer's blockbuster that turned her into a big-time star.
See also: big, time

big time

1. An enjoyable or exciting time, as in The children came home exhausted but happy; they really had a big time at the circus. [Mid-1800s]
2. The highest or most important level in any enterprise, as in I knew that when I made it through the last audition, I was finally in the big time. [Colloquial; c. 1900] Also see big league.
See also: big, time

big time

INFORMAL
You can use big time to emphasize the importance or extent of something. They messed up big time by refusing to take the work. With a little luck we could make this thing work big-time.
See also: big, time

the big time

COMMON The big time means fame and success. After a series of small but critically admired roles, the actor has now moved into the big time. Note: When someone becomes famous and successful, you can say that they hit the big time. He opened his own salon in 1923 and hit the big time in 1935, when he designed the wedding dress for the Duchess of Gloucester. Note: You can use big-time to describe someone or something that is very successful, powerful, or important. You'll be a rich man — you have the brains to make a big-time criminal.
See also: big, time

big time

1. n. the high level of success. I’ve finally reached the big time!
2. and big-time mod. outstanding; extravagant. This is one of your real big-time stars.
3. and big-time mod. felonious. (Underworld.) Frank is into big-time stuff now.
See also: big, time

big-time

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
But several big-timers flirted, and turned down the opportunity.
None of them were big-timers who thought 'He's a young lad, what's he saying to us?
Sadly for Walsall, that day was not yesterday as Graydon's men, needing victory to dislodge Fulham from pole position, were held to a draw by big-timers Manchester City.
He said: "There are no big-timers in our dressing-room.
They're hall of famers in the world of computers, big-science big-timers that any high-tech company would love to have on its team.
They seemed to get it last year, and we're optimistic they'll continue a we have the potential to make a respectable showing (at the national indoor meet), but the big-timers have to show up and score the points.
Anchored to the bottom after collecting just three points from a possible 30, and embarrassed by Anton Ferdinand's world tour of the Isle of Wight, they would not be in such a mess now if the big-timers had poured such effort into the battle on a more regular basis.
By the time these two NHL big-timers get back on the ice - both are in contract disputes - it could be time for the '98 Winter Olympics.
It will be players at their levels who will keep the faith rather than the so- called big-timers, who take without giving too much in return.
ANY day now tanned big-timers will be back from the beaches to tell us what a tiring soccer season lies ahead.