big leagues


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big leagues

An area, echelon, or sphere of great competition, success, power, achievement, etc. Refers to major (i.e., "big") leagues of sports teams. I know you're new here, but you need to perform much better than that. You're in the big leagues now. Welcome to the big leagues, senator.
See also: big, league

big league

An area of tough competition and high rewards; the largest or foremost of its kind. For example, Winning an Oscar put this unknown actress in the big league. The term alludes to the major (big) leagues of American baseball. [Late 1800s] Also see big time, def. 2.
See also: big, league

big league

1. n. a situation where competition is keen and a high level of performance is expected. (Usually plural. Referred originally to major league sports.) You’re in the big leagues now—no more penny-ante stuff.
2. and big-league mod. professional; big time. (From baseball.) When I’m a big-league star, I’ll send you free tickets.
See also: big, league
References in periodicals archive ?
Current and former Big League partners include Albert Pujols, Anthony Rizzo, Buster Posey, David Ortiz and Jose Bautista, and other players who advise, test, and approve Marucci's full line of baseball and softball products before going to market.
Masterson has spent time this spring getting to know John Smoltz, who has posted Hall of Fame-caliber numbers as a starter and a reliever in 20 years in the big leagues.
The message a young coach can send to his players is that many if not most of the players in the major leagues have pretty good (but not great) talent, and they are in the big leagues more because they have worked hard to develop good skills and mechanics rather than "because they were born with great talent.