better the devil you know than the devil you don't

better the devil you know than the devil you don't

When faced with two options, it is better to choose the more familiar one, even if it is undesirable. A: "Why don't you just quit your job if you're so miserable?" B: "Who knows if a new job will be any better! Better the devil you know than the devil you don't."
See also: better, devil, know
References in periodicals archive ?
Better the devil you know than the devil you don't.
It's often expressed in Britain with the old saw, "Better the devil you know than the devil you don't know."
Words I was greeted with a while ago, and ones which evince the reply: "I am fine, thank you, but please excuse the fact that I have now exchanged my forked tail for a clerical collar, as I have stopped being the Devil to take up God's work!" That greeting made me think of the proverb, "Better the Devil you know than the Devil you don't."
It's not just a case of blood being thicker than water, or even of 'better the devil you know than the devil you don't.' It's often about Wanting to get the preferred successor(s) involved so they can begin to get a handle on the business, the desire to help out a family member who can't get employment elsewhere, or to avoid a family argument.
"We don't know where we are going and I think it's a case of better the devil you know than the devil you don't."
In closing, may I say that I love my country and for me it's better the devil you know than the devil you don't know.
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