better off than (someone)

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better off than (someone)

In more favorable financial situation than someone else. With that big raise, you're now better off than most of your neighbors.
See also: better, off
References in classic literature ?
I find myself, even as I am, better off than the Elephant."
Alas!" he sighed quite sorrowful, and gazed at the chirping birds that hopped contentedly from branch to branch, "they are much better off than I!
I don't see that I should be any better off than I am now."
I shouldn't mind marrying, but I don't want to marry if I'm going to be no better off than what I am now.
The buyers and sellers, too, many of them, looked not much better off than the poor beasts they were bargaining about.
Bennet, shaking her head, "then she is better off than many girls.
You may be better off than we others," said Pierre.
After the fathers were out of debt, the daughters married the sons of neighbours--usually of like nationality-- and the girls who once worked in Black Hawk kitchens are to-day managing big farms and fine families of their own; their children are better off than the children of the town women they used to serve.
The pond lay still and motionless, glittering in the moonshine, and the hunter's wife was not a bit better off than she had been before.
India is better off than Pakistan here but can we find data on how Muslims in India fare specifically versus Indians as a whole?
While women expect to be PS150 a year better off than women who retired last year, men expect to be PS750 a year better off on average than men who retired in 2015.
adults say they are better off than eight years ago, sharply lower than the 73% who said the same in 2000.
Our economic proposals mean Wales would be PS2bn better off under Plaid than under a Labour government, and much better off than if the current Westminster government is re-elected, with all the damage that would do to Wales.
"And it was unfortunate that a senior politician and a member of SPLM in the person of Dr.Anne Ito dared saying the people of South Sudan are better off than three years ago.
Scotland's 'modest' 1% pay rise means its nurses are up to 700 [pounds sterling] a year better off than those in the other UK countries.