beside the point


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beside the point

Tangential or insignificant to the main issue being discussed. I do love the apartment, but that's beside the point because I don't have enough money for a security deposit right now. Your weekend plans are beside the point—let's get back to the topic at hand.
See also: beside, point

beside the point

 and beside the question
irrelevant; of no importance. That's very interesting, but beside the point. That's beside the point. You're evading the issue.
See also: beside, point

beside the point

Also, beside the mark or question . Irrelevant, off the subject. For example, Whether you had insurance is beside the point; the accident is your fault. These terms came into common use in the mid-1800s. Also see neither here nor there.
See also: beside, point

beside the ˈpoint

of no importance to the matter being discussed; irrelevant: His political interests are beside the point. All I want to know about him is whether he can do the job properly.
See also: beside, point

beside the point

Irrelevant to the matter at hand.
See also: beside, point

beside the point

Irrelevant. This expression, also put as beside the mark or purpose, dates from the sixteenth century. Thomas More wrote (1533), “He speketh al beside the purpose.”
See also: beside, point
References in periodicals archive ?
They might also be well made, but that's beside the point. Looking good is better than feeling good, as the joke goes.
In the latter case, as in much of the book, the skyscraper as a work of architecture is beside the point. And although the 'skyscraper problem' first identified by the American critic Montgomery Schuyler--how to make them authentic works of architecture--is an interesting one, there have been few good answers, and you would struggle to find many examples worth listing, particularly in the last fifty years.
The immediate response to this argument must be that it is beside the point. The point is, "What hath God said?" (Gen 3:1) Does God approve of and bless same-sex sexual acts, or does he condemn and punish them?
But the outcome of this debate is beside the point, as is President Bush's argument, long promoted by conservative think tanks such as the Cato Institute, that black Americans are shortchanged by Social Security because of our shorter life expectancy as compared to whites.
What I think should be beside the point." Directed by Jasson Minadakis and developed through Chicago Dramatists and Stage Left, Echoes runs Jan.
In the end it is beside the point to parse the motives of Winerip's anti-NCLB mania.
What also seemed beside the point to him was the dishonesty around men's socialized behavior toward women and their bodies.
Whether one agrees with the conflict or not is beside the point.
This fact, which some of Delgado's critics seem unaware of, makes the accusations of his being un-American somewhat beside the point. Canada has not been a member of the Coalition of the Willing, or the "Coalition of the Idiots," as Carolyn Parrish, a Toronto-area Member of Parliament recently called it.
Moving far beyond the usual numbingly PC portraits designed to show how normal the children of gay parents are, Abigail Garner presents a smart and impassioned argument that "normal" is beside the point. "LGBT families should be allowed to be just as wacky, troubled, or complex as any other American family," she writes in Families Like Mine.
Whether we agree or diagree that there is a health care crisis, whether we agree or disagree that medical malpractice presents any type of problem is beside the point. We are the givers of facts, especially between and among ourselves.
But that is all very much beside the point. We should remember that this is a comic book, not The Communist Manifesto, and it must, no matter what else, function as a comic book.
The poem, Shawcross maintains, helps readers live in uncertainty by showing that choices, as such, may well be beside the point, that life frequently offers not "either/or" but "this and that" (107).
However, a senior ministry official said, ''The target is just a goal and it is beside the point if we can achieve it.''
In particular, some commonly held but misguided assumptions about sleep in the nursing home should be addressed, for example, "Old people don't need much sleep" and, "Residents sleep a lot during the day, so they don't need as much sleep at night." Both these statements might hold true for many residents, but that's beside the point.