berth

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a soft berth

An easy post, position, or job. After retiring from the military, I landed a nice soft berth as a consultant for a security firm. I didn't run for mayor expecting to find a soft berth—I'm prepared to fight for the changes I believe will make this a better city!
See also: berth, soft

an easy berth

An easy post, position, or job. After retiring from the military, I landed a nice easy berth as a consultant for a security firm. I didn't run for mayor expecting to find an easy berth—I'm prepared to fight for the changes I believe will make this a better city!
See also: berth, easy

give (someone or something) a wide berth

To maintain a good distance from someone or something. Originally referred to ships. Once I learned that there was a lice outbreak, I gave all of my students a wide berth for the rest of the day. We've been giving John a wide berth ever since he dumped our good friend.
See also: berth, give, wide

wide berth

A good distance (between things, people, etc.). Originally referred to ships. Once I learned that there was a lice outbreak, I kept a wide berth from all of my students for the rest of the day. We've been keeping a wide berth from John ever since he dumped our good friend.
See also: berth, wide

give someone or something a wide berth

Fig. to keep a reasonable distance from someone or something; to steer clear (of someone or something). (Originally referred to sailing ships.) The dog we are approaching is very mean. Better give it a wide berth. Give Mary a wide berth. She's in a very bad mood.
See also: berth, give, wide

give a wide berth

Avoid, as in After Jane told on them, they gave her a wide berth. This expression alludes to giving a vessel enough room to swing at anchor so as to avoid a collision. [Mid-1800s]
See also: berth, give, wide

give someone/something a wide berth

If you give someone or something a wide berth, you deliberately avoid them. I don't mess with people like that, not me. I give them a wide berth. Having lived all my life in Africa I have a very healthy respect for snakes and give them a wide berth. Note: A berth is the amount of space which a sailing ship needs to manoeuvre safely.

give someone or something a wide berth

stay away from someone or something.
Berth is a nautical term which originally referred to the distance that ships should keep away from each other or from the shore, rocks, etc., in order to avoid a collision. Therefore, the literal meaning of the expression is ‘steer a ship well clear of something while passing it’.

give somebody/something a wide ˈberth

avoid meeting somebody; avoid going near or using something: He’s so boring I always try to give him a wide berth at parties.The roads are very dangerous there — I’d give them a wide berth and go by train.

soft berth

n. an easy situation; employment at an easy job. I hope I can arrange a soft berth for my brother, who just applied for a job here.
See also: berth, soft

a wide berth

Ample space or distance to avoid an unwanted consequence: gave their angry colleague a wide berth.
See also: berth, wide

give a wide berth to, to

To avoid. This term, which in the eighteenth century literally meant to give a ship plenty of room to swing at anchor, was transferred to other objects of avoidance and soon became a cliché. “I recommend you to keep a wide berth of me, sir,” wrote Thackeray (The Newcomes, 1854).
See also: berth, give, wide
References in periodicals archive ?
It said the LNG cargo reported in Pakistan as per stipulated time, but the delay in berthing due to weather was something that PSO did not have control over.
Various other military vessels responded off the coast of Louisiana following Hurricane Katrina in 2005, providing a range of support including berthing for relief workers, oil spill response, emergency medical assistance, and even kenneling for dogs and cats left stranded by the storm.
According to the sources, during the process of berthing pilots have to look at weather conditions and winds but it seems that an unhappy combination of factors resulted in this incident.
But in this case, according to the sources, it seems that the pilot had failed to control the speed and the angle of the incoming vessel at the time of berthing resulting in the collision.