bequeath to

bequeath (something) to (someone)

To posthumously leave something to someone, as in a will. Did Aunt Millie bequeath anything to us in her will? When my grandmother died, she bequeathed this vintage coffee table to me.
See also: bequeath

bequeath something to someone

to will something to someone; to leave something to someone. My uncle bequeathed some furniture to me. I will bequeath this watch to my grandson.
See also: bequeath
References in classic literature ?
But the inheritance consisted in this only, a scrap of paper on which Spada had written: -- `I bequeath to my beloved nephew my coffers, my books, and, amongst others, my breviary with the gold corners, which I beg he will preserve in remembrance of his affectionate uncle.
Her affection for him was still the chief sentiment in her heart; and he spoke without anger: he spoke in the deep tenderness of one about to leave his treasure amid perils and foes, where his remembered words would be the only aid that he could bequeath to guide her.
I now hereby bequeath to her my house and all that land with appurtenances outhouses etc.
If we succeed, we will better serve the public interest and bequeath to our successors a profession strengthened, ennobled and invigorated rather than enervated, demoralized and diminished.
Simply state in your will (or add, if you already have an established one): "I give, devise, and bequeath to [put name of environmental group and address here] the sum of $ to be used for its general purposes" (or whatever particular program you're interested in supporting).
Is this what we want to bequeath to our children, a nation caught in the grips of fantasy.