benchmark

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benchmark

Something against which to measure success or progress. We have several benchmarks that will help us to determine if your portfolio is experiencing solid growth. I'm so happy to share that I've reached the benchmark of six months of sobriety!
References in periodicals archive ?
The benchmarking questions from Xerox did not define areas of organizational function that should be benchmarked, such as the leadership or human resource systems.
Physical security controls should utilize physical barriers to protect assets from unauthorized access, damage, interference, and removal (Australian Standards 2001) and benchmarked as follows.
Information technology is available in the marketplace that allows all of us to obtain benchmarked, scientific, patient satisfaction measurement tools.
In cases where the activities being benchmarked are not real estate-related, it may also be valuable to use companies outside the real estate industry as benchmarks in order to access nationwide best practices.
The authors sought to determine what type of benchmarking program has been implemented, which areas have been benchmarked, whether or not improvement has been achieved, and if potential problems have occurred during the project.
Thus, the procurement cycle can also be benchmarked, even though only functional data were supplied.
For example, Southwest Airlines wanted faster, better maintenance; so, they benchmarked with a NASCAR racing pit crew.
* providing a selection criteria for what should be benchmarked and the preparation work involved,
In most of the benchmarked companies, the process of defining and crafting the corporate strategic message is an interactive effort between key decision makers and the internal communication department.
As such, it addresses the following topics: (1) why CC/PR should be benchmarked; (2) common myths which exist about benchmarking CC/PR; (3) types of CC/PR benchmarking that can be performed; (4) process models for performing CC/PR benchmarking; and (5) critical decisions which need to be considered with respect to conducting CC/PR benchmarking.
In the rush of enthusiasm to get at competitor or business leader information, firms must not forget the first step in benchmarking--to analyze and understand their own operations, specifically the one being benchmarked. This means documenting steps and processes in sufficient detail, recognizing patterns, and developing a flow chart of other tools that will allow for viable comparisons with other firms.