believe

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You may believe that such-and-such a horse will win the Derby.
do not believe in God, said Pierre, regretfully and with an effort, feeling it essential to speak the whole truth.
He who believes in separate and innumerable acts of creation will say, that in these cases it has pleased the Creator to cause a being of one type to take the place of one of another type; but this seems to me only restating the fact in dignified language.
Why, it proves that you believe with your generation.
Had I been so unhappy as not to believe in him until now," said Monte Cristo, "I must believe on seeing you.
Too well, also, do I know what they themselves most believe in.
Believe them to be stronger than I have declared; believe them, in short, to be such as his merit, and the suspicion--the hope of his affection for me may warrant, without imprudence or folly.
If you ask me what kind of wisdom, I reply, wisdom such as may perhaps be attained by man, for to that extent I am inclined to believe that I am wise; whereas the persons of whom I was speaking have a superhuman wisdom which I may fail to describe, because I have it not myself; and he who says that I have, speaks falsely, and is taking away my character.
We are acquainted, I believe," said Alexey Alexandrovitch indifferently, giving his hand.
Your connection with Scotland Yard ended, I believe, some time ago.
None of the country people round here, your own people, believe anything evil about you.
It was a hazardous enterprise both for him and for her, but he thought it necessary to consult with her on the subject of her projected departure, if not to calm her apprehensions respecting his health, and the worst result was a slight relapse of his illness, for no one knew of the visit but the inmates of the old Hall, except myself; and I believe it had not been his intention to mention it to me, for when I came to see him the next day, and observed he was not so well as he ought to have been, he merely said he had caught cold by being out too late in the evening.
This coolness arises partly from fear of the opponents, who have the laws on their side, and partly from the incredulity of men, who do not readily believe in new things until they have had a long experience of them.
One is apt, I believe, to connect assurance of manner with coquetry, and to expect that an impudent address will naturally attend an impudent mind; at least I was myself prepared for an improper degree of confidence in Lady Susan; but her countenance is absolutely sweet, and her voice and manner winningly mild.
You probably won't believe it, but the news made absolutely no difference to me one way or the other.