belabor the point

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belabor the point

To talk about or emphasize something more than is necessary, usually to the listener's boredom or annoyance. A: "I don't mean to belabor the point, but I'm just worried that there won't be enough food at the party." B: "Yeah, we know, you've said that 10 times now." I'm only belaboring the point because we still haven't reached a decision.
See also: point

belabor the point

to spend too much time on one item of discussion. I don't want to belabor the point, but the sooner we get this matter settled, the better. If the speaker would agree not to belabor the point further, I will place it on the agenda for resolution at the next meeting.
See also: point

belabor the point

Repeat an argument or other issue over and over, harp on something, as in We've discussed her decision-let's not belabor the point. This term dates from the mid-1900s and derives from belabor in the sense of "assail with words," a usage dating from the late 1500s.
See also: point
References in periodicals archive ?
I do not understand why Justice Carpio belabors the point that China hasn't accepted it,' Roque said.
Given his methodological assumptions, Dancy's inclusion of multiple arguments to elucidate each aspect of the theory of definition merely belabors the point.
And yet, just when you have grasped the "physician, heal thyself' theme, the play belabors the point not once but twice, while handing an angry Jung the rather unlikely line "The rest is silence" for those theatergoers who may have missed Fiennes' Hamlet some years ago.
In sum, except where the author unnecessarily belabors the point that maps inscribe social meanings, this book offers a fine account of the current state of English cartographic and chorographic studies as well as useful close readings of maps, map consciousness, and the early modern poetics of space.
Kukla belabors the point that it is not inconsistent to rely upon nonempirical virtues to justify empirical beliefs while denying them an epistemic role in evaluating theoretical hypotheses.
Rather than making her point about the impossibility of gaining this access with reference to one passage, Jacobs belabors the point too much, reading so closely that she loses sight of the proverbial forest for the trees.